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1838 NEWSPAPER WITH LETTER DISCUSSING NAVY ANIMOSITY TO MARINE CORPS "The Intelligencer", Washington, D.C.











Trask, Kerry A. BLACK HAWK: The Battle for the Heart of America. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Henry Holt & Company, 2005). 384 pages.
~~~ In the spring of 1832, Black Hawk and his Sauk followers, including 700 warriors, rose up in a rage and defiantly crossed the Mississippi to reclaim their ancestral home in Illinois. The rebellion was dashed in just three months, yet no other violent encounter between white America and native people embodies so clearly the U.S. Republic’s conflict between exalted ideals of freedom and human dignity and its insatiable appetite for territory. Until 1822, the 6,000-strong Sauk Nation had occupied one of North America’s largest Indian settlements, just east of the Mississippi. Supported by hundreds of acres of planted fields, their domain was the envy of white Americans who had already begun to encroach upon the rich land. When the conflicts between natives and white squatters inevitably turned violent, the Sauks were forced into exile, uprooted and banished to the uncharted west. Resurrecting the heroic efforts of Black Hawk and his men, Trask illuminates the tragic history of frontier America through the eyes of those who were cast aside in the pursuit of manifest destiny. \

$27.50















Carpenter, Jesse T., THE SOUTH AS A CONSCIOUS MINORITY, 1789-1861: A Study in Political Thought. University of South Carolina Press, 1991. NEW copy, PAPERBACK, still in shrinkwrap. With a new introduction by John M. McCardell. "... a fine study in the political thought of the Old South as a conscious minority seeking protection in the American Union from the political power of a Northern majority."
~~~ Paperback edition currently OUT OF PRINT. Hardcover in print at $89.

$20.00


Chevalier, Michael, SOCIETY, MANNERS, AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES: Letters on North America. Gloucester, Mass., Peter Smith, 1967. Edited and with an introduction by John William Ward. Translated after the T.G. Bradford Edition. NEW copy. Hardcover, issued without dust jacket.
~~~ OUT OF PRINT.


$35.00











Bordewich, Fergus M. AMERICA'S GREAT DEBATE: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise that Preserved the Union . NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Simon & Schuster, 2012). Notes, bibliography, index Notes, bibliography. 496 pages.
~~~ The Mexican War introduced vast new territories into the United States, among them California and the present-day Southwest. When gold was discovered in California in the great Gold Rush of 1849, the population swelled, and settlers petitioned for admission to the Union. But the U.S. Senate was precariously balanced with fifteen free states and fifteen slave states. Up to then states had been admitted in pairs, one free and one slave, to preserve that tenuous balance in the Senate. Would California be free or slave? So began a paralyzing crisis in American government, and the longest debate in Senate history. Fergus Bordewich tells the epic story of the Compromise of 1850 with skill and vigor, bringing to life two generations of senators who dominated the great debate. Luminaries such as John Calhoun, Daniel Webster, and Henry Clay—who tried unsuccessfully to cobble together a compromise that would allow for California’s admission and simultaneously put an end to the nation’s agony over slavery—were nearing the end of their long careers. Rising stars such as Jefferson Davis, William Seward, and Stephen Douglas—who ultimately succeeded where Clay failed—would shape the country’s politics as slavery gradually fractured the nation.
~~~ The Compromise saved the Union from collapse, but it did so at a great cost. The gulf between North and South over slavery widened with the strengthened Fugitive Slave Law that was part of the complex Compromise. In America’s Great Debate Fergus Bordewich takes us back to a time when compromise was imperative, when men swayed one another in Congress with the power of their ideas and their rhetoric, when partisans on each side reached across the aisle to preserve the Union from tragedy.

$30.00



Heidler, David S & Jeanne T. Heidler. HENRY CLAY: The Essential American . NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Random House, 2010). Notes, bibliography. 624 pages.
~~~ He was the Great Compromiser, a canny and colorful legislator whose life mirrors the story of America from its founding until the eve of the Civil War. Speaker of the House, senator, secretary of state, five-time presidential candidate, and idol to the young Abraham Lincoln, Henry Clay is captured in full at last in this rich and sweeping biography.
~~~ David S. Heidler and Jeanne T. Heidler present Clay in his early years as a precocious, witty, and optimistic Virginia farm boy who at the age of twenty transformed himself into an attorney. The authors reveal Clay’s tumultuous career in Washington, including his participation in the deadlocked election of 1824 that haunted him for the rest of his career, and shine new light on Clay’s marriage to plain, wealthy Lucretia Hart, a union that lasted fifty-three years and produced eleven children.
~~~ Featuring an inimitable supporting cast including Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Abraham Lincoln, Henry Clay is beautifully written and replete with fresh anecdotes and insights. Horse trader and risk taker, arm twister and joke teller, Henry Clay was the consummate politician who gave ground, made deals, and changed the lives of millions.

$30.00









Derr, Mark, THE FRONTIERSMAN: The Real Life and the Many Legends of Davy Crockett. VG+. Trade PAPERBACK. (NY: Quill, William Morrow, 1993). Illustrations, photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 304 pages.
~~~ Probably no figure in American history has been so frequently interpreted, reinterpreted, and misinterpreted as Davy Crockett, most notably as the flawless King of the Wild Frontier in the Disney TV series of the 1950s. Amazingly enough, until this biography by Mark Derr, no one has sifted through the surviving historical documents to find out the truth about a man who, for over a century and a half, has been one of the most enduring of American symbols. Lionized by his admirers for his humor and eccentricities and condemned by his detractors as a drunkard, gambler, womanizer, and illiterate, Crockett galvanized opinion from the moment he entered public life. Great bear hunter, controversial politician, putative hero of the Alamo, Crockett was, in fact, the quintessential product of the age of the Common Man and among the most famous Americans of the late 1820s and early 1830s. Born into a relatively poor family, forced at the age of twelve to begin working as a teamster, Crockett married at nineteen and became a tenant farmer in his native Tennessee. After serving without great distinction in the state militia during the War of 1812 and following the death of his first wife, he remarried, this time to Elizabeth Patton, a widow whose means and business acumen provided him with the financial resources and family connections to enter public life. Crockett's rough grammar and amusing anecdotes brought him victories in elections and notoriety in the press. Sent to Congress in 1827, three years later he broke ranks with the followers of Andrew Jackson over their failure to enact land reforms and their program to remove the Indians living east of the Mississippi. Freakishly beaten for reelection at the height of his national fame, he told his constituents, "You can go to Hell, and I'll go to Texas." Author Mark Derr presents the consequences of the fateful decision and offers his own resolution to the controversy that has surrounded Crockett's final moments at the Alamo.
~~~ Originally published at $12, now OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00


Groneman III, William, DAVID CROCKETT: Hero of the Common Man. NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. American Heroes Series. (NY: Forge, Tim Doherty Associates, 2005). Bibliography, index, 206 pages.
~~~ from Library Journal: Longtime Crockett researcher Groneman cuts through the myth and legend to uncover as much as possible of the real Davy Crockett (1786-1836). What emerges is a fascinating look at a man who was a typical product of western Tennessee: a frontiersman with little formal education, skilled in hunting, always in debt, and always looking for more "elbow room" where he might achieve financial success. Groneman focuses considerable attention on two more remarkable aspects of Crockett's career: his three terms in the U.S. Congress, which made him a national figure, and his service at the Battle of the Alamo, where he was killed. In considering Crockett's death, Groneman's discussion is a bit dated, as he apparently did not have access to James Crisp's Sleuthing the Alamo (2004). Specialists will deplore the lack of notes, but general readers, high school students, and undergraduates will welcome this well-written biography as a good starting point for discovering Crockett as he really was.

$12.95


Levy, Buddy, AMERICAN LEGEND: The Real-Life Adventures of David Crockett. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: GP Putnam's Sons, 2005). First Edition. Two-page map of "Crockett's America" on end pages. Illustrations, photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 339 pages.
~~~ from Publishers Weekly: Levy presents a sympathetic but unremarkable biography of the legendary frontiersman in colloquial if occasionally florid prose (an election loss "burned into Crockett like a brand searing a cow's flank"). Those whose image of Crockett was formed by the cultishly successful Disney treatment will find much that is familiar: the Indian fighter with Andrew Jackson, the congressmen from Tennessee and, finally, the Texas patriot who died defending the Alamo. But Levy offers more (although not a lot more) in the way of background and complexity, and is willing to expose some of Crockett's deficiencies without making judgments: Crockett clearly indulged his wanderlust at the expense of his wife, a strong figure in her own right, and was, for a variety of reasons, an ineffective, bumbling politician. But despite his faults, readers will find Crockett likable and talented. In Levy's view, Crockett's abilities were expansive, and he opines that Crockett's bestselling 1834 autobiography "prefigures by some fifty years the literary genre of `realism,' with nothing remotely like it" until Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. And Crockett's falling out with President Jackson over, in part, Jackson's brutal Indian Removal Act of 1830 is to the frontiersman's credit.

$25.95



Rourke, Constance, DAVY CROCKETT. VG/VG. Minor tears & scuffs to jacket, which is in mylar protector. (NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc, 1962). Book Club editon. Reprint of original 1934 edition. Illustrated by Walter Seaton. 256 pages.
~~~ Blending myth and reality, Constance Rourke aimed to get at the heart of Davy Crockett, whose hold on the American imagination was firm even before he died at the Alamo. Davy Crockett, published in 1934, pioneered in showing the backwoodsman's transformation into a folk hero. It remains a basic in the Crockett literature.

$25.00






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