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Greene, Nannie and Catherine Stokes Sheppard (compilers), COMMUNITY AND CHANGE IN THE NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS: Oral Histories and Profiles of People from Western Watauga County
. . NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2006). 64 photographs, appendix, index, 300 pp.
~~~ Oral history and memoirs preserve much more than a single event. They record information about a time and a particular way of life. Buying a loaf of bread for a dime and a 25-pound bag of flour for a dollar, walking 9 ˝ miles in 5 hours, watching the Cove Creek gym (and several school buses) go up in flames—these are just a few of the tales related in this collection of oral and written histories. ~~~ From boating to a finding a first job, from riding a pony to school to joining the Navy, this book contains dozens of memories gathered from the residents of western Watauga County, North Carolina. Concentrating primarily on the decades of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, these stories focus on the elements of everyday life in a mountain community. They deal with both traditional rural activities—such as berry picking, soap making, trading and bartering—and universal experiences such as school days and dating. The book includes a special section on the war experiences of Watauga County residents both at home and overseas. Contemporary photographs and an index are included.

$30.00

Hamby, Zetta Barker, MEMOIRS OF GRASSY CREEK: Growing Up in the Mountains on the Virginia–North Carolina Line.
. . NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1998). Photographs, facsimiles, index, 264 pp.
~~~ Born on January 5, 1907, Zetta Hamby spent much of her life in the northwestern mountains of North Carolina, keenly watching the changes in her community of Grassy Creek and in the world. Families, homes, weddings and funerals, politics, health, world war, race relations, the telephone—those are among the topics touched on in this firsthand look at rural Appalachia in the early decades of the present century. Sometimes poignant, often humorous, and surely authentic, these stories are yet another reminder of recent history that is all too quickly being lost.

$30.00







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House, Silas & Jason Howard. SOMETHING'S RISING: Appalachians Fighting Mountaintop Removal. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2011). 6x9. Reprint edition. Forward by Lee Smith. Notes, bibliography, appendices, index, 305 pages.

~~~ Like an old-fashioned hymn sung in rounds, Something's Rising gives a stirring voice to the lives, culture, and determination of the people fighting the destructive practice of mountaintop removal in the coalfields of central Appalachia. Each person's story, unique and unfiltered, articulates the hardship of living in these majestic mountains amid the daily desecration of the land by the coal industry because of America's insistence on cheap energy. Developed as an alternative to strip mining, mountaintop removal mining consists of blasting away the tops of mountains, dumping waste into the valleys, and retrieving the exposed coal. This process buries streams, pollutes wells and waterways, and alters fragile ecologies in the region. The people who live, work, and raise families in central Appalachia face not only the physical destruction of their land but also the loss of their culture and health in a society dominated by the consequences of mountaintop removal. Included here are oral histories from Jean Ritchie, "the mother of folk," who doesn't let her eighty-six years slow down her fighting spirit; Judy Bonds, a tough-talking coal-miner's daughter; Kathy Mattea, the beloved country singer who believes cooperation is the key to winning the battle; Jack Spadaro, the heroic whistle-blower who has risked everything to share his insider knowledge of federal mining agencies; Larry Bush, who doesn't back down even when speeding coal trucks are used to intimidate him; Denise Giardina, a celebrated writer who ran for governor to bring attention to the issue; and many more. The book features both well-known activists and people rarely in the media. Each oral history is prefaced with a biographical essay that vividly establishes the interview settings and the subjects' connections to their region. Written and edited by native sons of the mountains, this compelling book captures a fever-pitch moment in the movement against mountaintop removal. Silas House and Jason Howard are experts on the history of resistance in Appalachia, the legacy of exploitation of the region's natural resources, and area's unique culture and landscape. This lyrical and informative text provides a critical perspective on a powerful industry. The cumulative effect of these stories is stunning and powerful. Something's Rising will long stand as a testament to the social and ecological consequences of energy at any cost and will be especially welcomed by readers of Appalachian studies, environmental science, and by all who value the mountain's majesty -- our national heritage.

$28.50




Burns, Shirley Steward. BRINGING DOWN THE MOUNTAINS: The Impact of Mountaintop Removal Surface Coal Mining on Southern West Virginia Communities, 1970 - 2004. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, 2007). Notes, bibliography, appendices, index, 215 pages.

~~~ Coal is West Virginia’s bread and butter. For more than a century, West Virginia has answered the energy call of the nation—and the world—by mining and exporting its coal. In 2004, West Virginia’s coal industry provided almost forty thousand jobs directly related to coal, and it contributed $3.5 billion to the state’s gross annual product. And in the same year, West Virginia led the nation in coal exports, shipping over 50 million tons of coal to twenty-three countries. Coal has made millionaires of some and paupers of many. For generations of honest, hard-working West Virginians, coal has put food on tables, built homes, and sent students to college. But coal has also maimed, debilitated, and killed. Bringing Down the Mountains provides insight into how mountaintop removal has affected the people and the land of southern West Virginia. It examines the mechanization of the mining industry and the power relationships between coal interests, politicians, and the average citizen.

$27.50



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