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click to enlarge Chapman, Paul. MENIN GATE SOUTH. NEW copy, hardcover. (Pen & Sword, September 2016). 416 pages.

This is a comprehensive and highly emotive volume, borne of years of intensive research and many trips to the battlefields of the Great War. It seeks to humanize Tyne Cot cemetery, to offer the reader a chance to engage with the personal stories of the soldiers whose names have been chiseled there in stone. Poignant stories of camaraderie, tragic twists of fate and noble sacrifice have been collated in an attempt to bring home the reality of war and the true extent of its tragic cost. It is hoped that visitors to the battlefields, whether their relatives are listed within or not, will find their experience enriched by having access to this treasure trove of stories.

$60.00




click to enlarge Chapman, Paul. TYNE COT CEMETERY AND MEMORIAL. NEW copy, hardcover. (Pen & Sword, October 2016). 304 pages.

This is a comprehensive and highly emotive volume, borne of years of intensive research and many trips to the battlefields of the Great War. It seeks to humanize Tyne Cot cemetery, to offer the reader a chance to engage with the personal stories of the soldiers whose names have been chiseled there in stone. Poignant stories of camaraderie, tragic twists of fate and noble sacrifice have been collated in an attempt to bring home the reality of war and the true extent of its tragic cost. It is hoped that visitors to the battlefields, whether their relatives are listed within or not, will find their experience enriched by having access to this treasure trove of stories.

$50.00




Garfield, John. THE FALLEN: A Photographic Journey through the War Cemeteries and Memorials of the Great War, 1914-18. . VG/VG. Hardcover with dust jacket. Introduction by Gavin Stamp. (London: Leo Cooper, 1990). First Edition. Photographs, maps, Chronology of Events, 310 pages.

~~~ Time has undoubtedly proven that the cemeteries of the First World War have admirably fulfilled their tragic and sombre purpose. The task which faced the Imperial War Graves Commission at the end of the war was formidable indeed. But, somehow, out of that once-ravaged terrain, they conjured resting-places for the dead of a beauty and a dignity in every way worthy of the sacrifice of those who lie there. The Commission still maintains these cemeteries and to visit them today is an experience by which only the hardest of heart can fail to be deeply moved.
~~~ This feeling is strikingly evoked by John Garfield's beautiful photographs which are the soul and spirit of his book and which covers, not only the Western Front, but also Gallipoli, Northern Italy and Macedonia. A brief text accompanies each photograph, explaining who was fighting whom, and the place and date of each encounter.

$45.00













Graham, John W., THE GOLD STAR MOTHER PILGRIMAGES OF THE 1930s. . NEW copy, trade PAPERBACK. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, 2006). Photographs, chronology, notes, bibliography, index, 239 pp.
~~~ During the first World War, a flag with a gold star identified families who had lost soldiers. Grieving women were “Gold Star” mothers and widows. Between 1930 and 1933, the United States government took 6,654 Gold Star pilgrims to visit their sons’ and husbands’ graves in American cemeteries in Belgium, England, and France. Veteran Army officers acted as tour guides, helping women come to terms with their losses as they sought solace and closure. The government meticulously planned and paid for everything from transportation and lodging to menus, tips, sightseeing, and interpreters. Flowered wreaths, flags, and camp chairs were provided at the cemeteries, and official photographers captured each woman standing at her loved one’s grave.
~~~ This work covers the Gold Star pilgrimages from their launch to the present day, beginning with an introduction to the war and wartime burial. Subsequent topics include the legislative struggle and evolution of the pilgrimage bill; personal pilgrimages, including that of the parents of poet Joyce Kilmer; the role of the Quartermaster Corps; the segregation controversy; a close examination of the first group to travel, Party A of May 1930; and the results of the pilgrimage experience as described by participants, observers, organizers, and scholars, researched through diaries, letters, scrapbooks, interviews, and newspaper

$40.00





click to enlarge Hughes, John Peter. VISTING THE FALLEN - Arras North. NEW copy, hardcover. (Pen & Sword, 2015). 6x9, 8 page picture section.

~~~ A 'Who's Who' of those buried in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries located in and around Arras, Northern France. It will also cover the four memorials to the missing within that area. As such, it is a guide book rather than a chronological narrative of the war.
~~~ The aim of the book is to take the reader/visitor to each cemetery or memorial in turn and to highlight many of the individuals buried or commemorated there. Around 170 cemeteries are covered, as well as the Arras Memorial, the Vis-en-Artois Memorial, the Canadian National Memorial at Vimy Ridge, and the Royal Flying Services Memorial at Arras.
~~~ Like Ypres, Arras was a front line town throughout the Great War. From March 1916 it became home to the British Army and it remained so until the Advance to Victory was well under way. In 1917 the Battle of Arras came and went. It occupied barely half a season, but was then largely forgotten; the periods before and after it have been virtually ignored, and yet the Arras sector was always important and holding it was never easy or without incident; death, of course, was never far away. The area around Arras is as rich in Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries as anywhere else on the Western Front, including the Somme and Ypres, and yet these quiet redoubts with their headstones proudly on parade still remain largely unvisited. This book is the story of the men who fell and who are now buried in those cemeteries; and the telling of their story is the telling of what it was like to be a soldier on the Western Front.
~~~ The book is overwhelmingly devoted to the First World War dead, but there are a number of cemeteries in the area, particularly village communal cemeteries, where there are Second World War burials. We intend to include these cemeteries, as they take up little space, and they also reveal some great characters and some great stories. Each cemetery and memorial is examined in quite some detail.
~~~ Some men are highlighted for who they were; for example, sons of politicians, aristocracy, or some other point of biographical interest. Particular attention is given to gallantry awards, and not just VC holders, while some entries are included for reasons of human interest; for example, an uncle and nephew killed by the same shell and buried together; the body of a son discovered and exhumed by his father; a young soldier who went out to into no man's land to search for and bring back the body of his brother; and a man who crossed the snowbound Andes using local guides just to get to a port in order to return to England to enlist.

$50.00




click to enlarge Hughes, John Peter. VISTING THE FALLEN - Arras South. NEW copy, hardcover. (Pen & Sword, 2015). 6x9, 8 page picture section, 320 pages.

~~~ Like Ypres, Arras was a front line town throughout the Great War. From March 1916 it became home to the British Army and it remained so until the Advance to Victory was well under way. In 1917 the Battle of Arras came and went. It occupied barely half a season, but was then largely forgotten; the periods before and after it have been virtually ignored, and yet the Arras sector was always important and holding it was never easy or without incident; death, of course, was never far away. The area around Arras is as rich in Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries as anywhere else on the Western Front, including the Somme and Ypres, and yet these quiet redoubts with their headstones proudly on parade still remain largely unvisited. This book is the story of the men who fell and who are now buried in those cemeteries; and the telling of their story is the telling of what it was like to be a soldier on the Western Front.
~~~ Arras-South is the companion volume to Arras-North and is written by the same author. It contains comprehensive coverage of over 60 Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries to be found in Arras and to the south of the town. It has a wealth of gallantry awards, including their citations, and features hundreds of officers and other ranks who fell, not just at the Battle of Arras in 1917, but also many of those who died in 1916 and the final year of the war. Many small actions, raids and operations are described in a book that tells the story of warfare on the Western Front through the lives of those who fought and died on the battlefields of Arras.
~~~ There are personalities, interesting characters and the well-connected, ordinary soldiers and many unsung heroes, families torn apart by war, fathers, sons and brothers, poets and padres. There is a link to Ulster and the Curragh Incident and a connection to King George V and Queen Mary, a hero of the Messina earthquake disaster in 1908, a father whose search for his son's grave reaches its sad conclusion, a mysterious death in woodland, the moving spectacle of men waiting outside makeshift confessionals in a barn lit by candlelight before going up the line into battle, and a man whose father was a close collaborator with Sir Fabian Ware during the early days of the War Graves Registration Commission; there is even a remarkable prehistoric discovery and an improbable tale regarding an African hawk eagle that would not be out of place in a Harry Potter film. This is an essential reference guide for anyone visiting Arras and its battlefields.

$49.95




click to enlarge Linge, Ken & Pam Linge. MISSING BUT NOT FORGOTTEN: Men of the Thiepval Memorial - Somme. NEW copy, hardcover. (Pen & Sword, 2015). 6x9, 300 illustrations, 288 pages.

~~~ The Thiepval Memorial commemorates over 72,000 men who have no known grave; all went missing in the Somme sector during the three years of conflict that finally ended on 20 March 1918.
~~~ The book is not a military history of the Battle of the Somme, it is about personal remembrance, and features over 200 fascinating stories of the men who fought and died and whose final resting places have not been identified. Countries within the UK are all well represented, as are the men whose roots were in the far-flung reaches of the Empire and even ‘foreigners’. The stories that lie behind each of the names carved into the memorial’s panels illustrate the various backgrounds and differing lives of these men. The diverse social mix of the men – young and old, ‘gentry’ to ‘laborers’, actors, artists, clergy, poets, sportsmen, writers, and more – is something that stands out in the book. Despite their social differences, what is most apparent is the wide impact of the loss for over fifty widows, around 100 children left fatherless and over thirty families mourning more than one son. Ranks from private to lieutenant colonel are expertly covered, as well as all seven winners of the VC.
~~~ These captivating stories stand as remembrance for each man and to all the others on the memorial. They are meticulously organized so the book can be of use to visitors as they walk around the memorial; as a name is viewed, the story behind that name can be read.

$49.95




click to enlarge Longworth, Philip. THE UNENDING VIGIL: The History of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Pen & Sword, 2011). 5.5x8.5, 304 pages.

~~~ One million, one hundred thousand men and women lost their lives in the service of the British Empire during the First World War; in the Second, another six hundred thousand from all parts of the Commonwealth made the same sacrifice.
~~~ The First World War, which began as a war between professional armies, was very soon to be fought by millions of ordinary citizens turned soldier. Those who died could no longer be "shoveled into a hole … and so forgotten" as had happened, to Thackeray’s indignation, at Waterloo, and in May 1917 a new organization, the Imperial War Graves Commission, was founded to provide permanent care for their graves and commemoration for the missing.
~~~ The Unending Vigil tells the story of the Commission – of its beginnings on the Western Front, with the efforts of one extraordinary man who conceived and directed it through to the conclusion of the Second World War, and of its work since then. Renamed in 1960 the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, its operations today extend over 140 countries.
~~~ On behalf of the Commission, outstanding architects, sculptors, engineers, horticulturalists and men of letters combined to design war cemeteries and memorials that would last for perhaps a thousand years. After both wars, and often against great odds and in appalling conditions, the staff of the Commission, and in many cases themselves comrades of the dead, labored to fulfill those designs, turning scenes of desolation and horror into places of peace and haunting beauty. It was a task, Rudyard Kipling said, greater than that of the Pharaohs – "and they only worked in their own country". The Commission task was, and still is, worldwide.

$24.95




click to enlarge Murland, Jerry. ARISTOCRATS GO TO WAR: Uncovering the Zillebeke Cemetery. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Pen & Sword, 2010). 6x9.5, 16 pages b&w photographs, 192 pages.

~~~ One million, one hundred thousand men and women lost their lives in the service of the British Empire during the First World War; in the Second, another six hundred thousand from all parts of the Commonwealth made the same sacrifice.
~~~ The First World War, which began as a war between professional armies, was very soon to be fought by millions of ordinary citizens turned soldier. Those who died could no longer be "shoveled into a hole … and so forgotten" as had happened, to Thackeray’s indignation, at Waterloo, and in May 1917 a new organization, the Imperial War Graves Commission, was founded to provide permanent care for their graves and commemoration for the missing.
~~~ The Unending Vigil tells the story of the Commission – of its beginnings on the Western Front, with the efforts of one extraordinary man who conceived and directed it through to the conclusion of the Second World War, and of its work since then. Renamed in 1960 the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, its operations today extend over 140 countries.
~~~ On behalf of the Commission, outstanding architects, sculptors, engineers, horticulturalists and men of letters combined to design war cemeteries and memorials that would last for perhaps a thousand years. After both wars, and often against great odds and in appalling conditions, the staff of the Commission, and in many cases themselves comrades of the dead, labored to fulfill those designs, turning scenes of desolation and horror into places of peace and haunting beauty. It was a task, Rudyard Kipling said, greater than that of the Pharaohs – "and they only worked in their own country". The Commission task was, and still is, worldwide.

$39.95





click to enlarge Skelton, Tim & Gerald Gliddon. LUTYENS AND THE GREAT WAR. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Frances Lincoln). 10x11.5, illustrated, 224 pages.

~~~ Although Sir Edwin Lutyens is commonly celebrated for his large houses for wealthy clients, much of his work was designed in connection with the First World War and remains relatively unknown. This volume describes the variety of these moving works in the context of Lutyens's overall output. It includes lesser-known masterpieces such as the beautiful war memorial at Spalding and the cemeteries at Monchy and Croisilles in France. Import. Well illustrated in color.

$60.00





Winter, Jay. SITES OF MEMORY, SITES OF MOURNING: The Great War in European Cultural History .NF/NF. Hardcover with dust jacket. In 'as new' condition, with jacket in mylar protector. (Cambridge University Press, 1995). First Edition. Photographs, extensive notes, index, 310 pages.

~~~ Jay Winter's powerful and substantial new study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Using a great variety of literary, artistic and architectural evidence, Dr Winter looks anew at the ways, many of them highly traditional, in which communities endeavoured to find collective solace after 1918. The result is a profound and moving book, of seminal importance for the attempt to understand the course of European history during the first half of the twentieth century.

$55.00



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