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Bernstein, Peter L., WEDDING OF THE WATERS: The Erie Canal and the Making of a Great Nation. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. W.W. Norton & Company, 2005. 448 pages.
~~~ "The history of the Erie Canal is a story of American ingenuity. A great project that Thomas Jefferson judged to be 'little short of madness,' and that others compared with going to the moon, soon turned into one of the most successful and influential public investments in American history. In Wedding of the Waters, best-selling author Peter L. Bernstein recounts the canal's creation within the larger tableau of a youthful America in the first quarter-century of the 1800s. Leaders of the fledgling nation had quickly recognized that the Appalachian mountain range was a formidable obstacle to uniting the Atlantic states with the vast lands of the west. A pathway for commerce as well as travel was critical to the security and expansion of the Revolution's unprecedented achievement. Bernstein examines the social ramifications, political squabbles, and economic risks and returns of this mammoth project. He goes on to demonstrate how the canal's creation helped bind the western settlers in the new lands to their fellow Americans in the original colonies, knitted the sinews of the American industrial revolution, and even influenced profound economic change in Europe.

$24.95





Freeman, Joanne B., AFFAIRS OF HONOR: National Politics in the New Republic. . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002). Illustrated, extensive notes & bibliography, index, 376 pages.
~~~ This groundbreaking book offers a major reassessment of the tumultuous culture of politics on the national stage during America's earliest years, when Jefferson, Burr, Hamilton, and other national leaders struggled to define themselves and their role in the new nation. Joanne Freeman shows how the rituals and rhetoric of honor provided ground rules for political combat, how gossip, print warfare, and dueling became accepted political weapons, and how the founders jostled for political power in the nascent republic.
~~~ Hardcover originally in print at $29.95, now OUT OF PRINT. Paperback in print at $18.00.

$25.00



~ SOLD ~ Griffen, John W. (intro by), NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE TO THE SPANISH MAIN. University Presses of Florida, 1978. Full title reads: NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE TO THE SPANISH MAIN IN THE SHIP TWO FRIENDS; THE OCCUPATION OF AMELIA ISLAND, BY M'GROGOR, &c.~ SKETCHES OF THE PROVINCE OF EAST FLORIDA; AND ANECDOTES ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE HABITS AND MANNERS OF THE SEMINOLE INDIANS; WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A DETAIL OF THE SEMINOLE WAR, AND THE EXECUTION OF ARBUTHNOT AND AMBRISTER. A facsimile reproduction of the 1819 edition, with an introduction and index by John W. Griffin. Bicentennial Floridiana Facsimile Series. NEW copy. Hardcover without dust jacket, as issued. 338 pages. Out of Print. $35.00
Hoffman, Ronald and Peter J. Albert, LAUNCHING THE "EXTENDED REPUBLIC": The Federalist Era. . NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket, still in shrinkwrap. (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1996). Published for the United States Capitol Historical Society. 327 pages.
~~~ The essays in this volume explore some of the potentially divisive realities that characterized the Federalist Era. Nine distinguished authors address themes that include the ideological assumptions that fueled the political debate, the interrelated character of social and political history, the role of the courts as an emerging force in arbitrating and containing conflict, and the expansionist impulses that pushed the new nation's borders westward. Gordon S. Wood introduces the collection with an incisive overview of the bold ambitions and unfulfilled aspirations of the critical first decade of the United States.
~~~ From Booknews: "Nine essays in which modern historians explore the concerns during the 1790s that the centralist government created by the new US Constitution would not hold together. Among the topics are judicial review, treason law from 1787 to 1860, the Blount conspiracy, inland waterways, the Indian problem, and ancient lodges and self-created societies."
~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$45.00




Holliman, Jennie. AMERICAN SPORTS, 1785-1835. Philadelphia: Porcupine Press, 1975. NEW copy. Hardcover without dustjacket, as issued. Reprint of the original 1931 edition, with new illustrations. Notes, bibliography, index, 222 pages. Deals with hunting, fishing, ball playing, quoits, ninepins, skittles & bowls, dollar pitching, long bullets, archery, swimming, skating, sleighing, horse racing, cockfighting, animal baiting, gander pulling, gouging & boxing, wrestling, walking, foot racing, boat racing, women's & children's sports. Published in 1975 at $35, now OUT OF PRINT.

$40.00

Hyman, Harold M., AMERICAN SINGULARITY: THE 1787 NORTHWEST ORDINANCE, THE MORRILL ACTS, AND THE 1944 G.I. BILL . University of Georgia Press, 1986. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. Notes, index, 95 pages. "...explores the question of American singularity, using the Northwest Ordinance, the Homestead and Morrill acts, and the G.I. Bill to measure individual access to land, education, and law..." OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00







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Ketcham, Ralph, PRESIDENTS ABOVE PARTY: The First American Presidency, 1789-1829. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984. NEW copy, still in shrinkwrap. A comprehensive study of the early presidency, the rise of nonpartisan consensus and its eventual collapse.
~~~ Out of Print


$40.00














Holden, Robert John, with Donna Jean Holden, THE HUNTING PIONEERS, 1720-1840: Ultimate Backwoodsmen on the Early American Frontier . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Heritage Books, 2004. Indices, bibiiography, map, 232 pages. "This book is the first comprehensive account of the ultimate wilderness archetypes - the hunting pioneer families in the deep woods. These hunting pioneers had a totally different perspective on the wilderness than did the farming pioneers who far outnumbered them. The hunting pioneers continually sought out remote forests where the game animals roamed, while the farming pioneers followed close behind, methodically destroying those wilds with their axes and plows. A dynamic force from the early 1700's to the mid-1800s, the hunting pioneers originated in the Delaware River colony of New Sweden. The Swede-Finns lived there in the forests where their way of life was greatly influenced by the local Indians. Over the years, these Swede-Finns were joined by English, German, and Scotch-Irish immigrants who also adopted the hunting pioneer lifestyle. Together they led the frontier advance through the backcountry of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia, all the way to the edge of the treeless Great Plains.Often illiterate, the hunting pioneers left virtually no written records. Fortunately, foreign and American travelers recorded their impressions of these colorful backwoods people, describing in detail their clothing, dwellings and unique lifestyle. Excerpts from thirty of these eyewitness descriptions have been included in this work. The book contains an introduction, six chapters, a summary, endnotes, a bibliography, and a fullname plus subject index. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the hunting pioneers' role in American frontier history and compares the similarities and differences among the hunting pioneers and their two greatest nemeses: the Indians and the farming pioneers. Chapter 2 explores the background and evolution of the hunting pioneers. Chapter 3 recounts the role of the hunting pioneers in wilderness warfare, including the siege of Boonesborough, the capture of Fort Sackville, the Battle of King's Mountain, the Battle of Blue Licks, and several clashes with the Indians north of the Ohio River. The remaining chapters describe the advance of the hunting pioneers into the Ohio River Valley, the Illinois Country, the South, and across the Mississippi River to the edge of the Great Plains. This book is a wonderful resource for historians, re-enactors, and genealogists."



$22.50







Kindig, Joe, Jr., THOUGHTS ON THE KENTUCKY RIFLE IN ITS GOLDEN AGE. . VG-/VG+. Oversized book. Jacket is nearly flawless (darker shaded areas in picture are due to scanning: the actual jacket is uniformly bright). Book has small but significant flaw to front cover: on bottom edge near spine, cloth has been worn through to the paper. Board here is slightly bumped, with also a clean half-inch tear to cloth along spine-edge. Both bump & tear to cloth are inconspicuous: the chief flaw is to bottom edge, as previously described. Spine and covers otherwise tight and intact. Board edges otherwise unworn. Interior clean, tight and unmarked. (NY: Bonanza Books, 1964). Longrifle Series. Profusely illustrated throughout, index, 561 pages.
~~~ Mr Kindig's thoughts concern American flintlock rifles as works of art and this book is a grand display of this art. His thesis is that the gunsmiths who made these rifles were the finest artisans who worked in early America. He proves this by showing detailed photos of 262 of the finest pieces from his famous collection.
~~~ Flintlock rifles were produced chiefly along the Appalachian Piedmont from the eastern border of Pennsylvania to South Carolina. From locality to locality within this region distinctly different artistic details were used to decorate the rifles and distinctly different styles of stock architecture and metal mountings were used. Kindig's study is the first to recognize the existence of these many schools of gunsmithing and to show the importance of them to the study of the rifle and its art.

$245.00

Rosenberger, Richard F. and Charles Kaufmann, THE LONGRIFLES OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA: ALLEGHENY AND WESTMORELAND COUNTIES. University of Pittsburgh Press, 1993., F/F, like new. 1st American edition. 9"x11" oblong. B&W and color photos by Bill Owen.139 pp, glossy paper.
~~~ The American longrifle, also known as the Kentucky rifle, was the finest rifle in the world for over a century. As this beautifully illustrated book shows, the gunmakers of western Pennsylvania were second to none in their skill and artistry. From the first settling of the land west of the Alleghenies, local gunsmiths produced the rifles that enabled the frontier family to survive in the wilderness... ..the definitive work on the guns and gunsmiths of Allegheny & Westmoreland counties from the mid-18th century to about 1870, with an emphasis on the "golden age" (1785-1815). Rosenberger & Kaufmann present a brief history of t he longrifle, an introduction to its manufacture and use in western Pennsylvania in the 18th & 19th centuries, biographies of all major gunmakers & detailed descriptions of known guns. They include 58 longrifles & pistols, each photgraphed in three views. Several are in full color. Closeups reveal the exceptionally fine detail on some of the rifles."


$50.00


Whisker, James B., ARMS MAKERS OF PENNSYLVANIA. Susquehanna University Press, 1990., NEW, a mint copy. Hardcover issued without dust jacket. 9x12.5. Glossy paper throughout. Hundreds of photographs & illustrations of rifles, gunsmith portraits & period advertisements. Introduction, Abbreviations, Biographies of Arms Makers of Pennsylvania, Appendices, Bibliography, extensive notes, 218 pp. "Focuses on the Pennsylvania long "Kentucky" rifle, and identifies the primary schools of gun making and major technological developments." A substantial, indispensable study by one of the leading scholars in the field.

$60.00



[Milton] Schulman, Lydia Dittler, PARADISE LOST, AND THE RISE OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC . Northeastern University Press , 1992. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket, still in shrinkwrap. Notes, bibliography, index, 273 pages. Synopsis: "This book examines "how American readers understood and employed Milton's text before, during, and after the American Revolution. Contending that Milton's epic, which was written after the fall of the English Commonwealth, represented the author's 'reflections on the difficulties of creating and sustaining . . . governments that ultimately rest upon the virtue and self-discipline of their citizens', Schulman suggests that this embedded debate on republicanism made his poem a touchstone for secular politicians during the rise of the American republic." (American Literature). From Booknews: "Schulman argues that an important, overlooked key to uncovering the social and political subtext of Milton's (1608-1674) epic is its popularity and use in the early American republic. At the same time, she demonstrates that an examination of the American reception of Paradise Lost contributes to an understanding of the ideological origins of the American Revolution." Annotation. From The American Historical Review: "For Schulman, the real point is Milton's argument that republican liberty, based on an educated, virtuous citizenry, must meet the challenge of controlling narrow self-interest through enlightened reason. . . . If Schulman inevitably fails to prove her thesis 'definitively,' she succeeds admirably in suggesting the complexity of Milton's role in the still lively debate over the soul of the republic. Her book is a strong contribution to that debate."

$45.00

[Milton] Stavely, Keith W. F., PURITAN LEGACIES: Paradise Lost and the New England Tradition, 1630-1890. Cornell University Press, 1995. NEW copy. PAPERBACK. Notes, index, 312 pages. Stavely presents "Milton's Paradise Lost as a model of the tensions inherent in mid-17th-century English Puritanism and in New England Puritanism through 1890. He {seeks to} show how Milton's portrayal of Adam, Eve, and Satan represents persistent Puritan conflicts between hierarchy and egalitarian individual autonomy and between rationality and enthusiasm. {In an attempt} to illustrate his thesis, Stavely studies the career of 18th-century Westborough, Massachusetts pastor Rev. Ebenezer Parkman and 19th-century Marlborough, Massachusetts newspaper editor Charles F. Morse."

$19.00


[Milton] Van Anglen, K.P., NEW ENGLAND MILTON: Literary Reception and Cultural Authority in the Early Republic . Pennsylvania State University Press , 1993. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket, still in shrinkwrap. Notes, bibliography, index, 255 pages. "This is a study of interpretations of Milton by New England intellectuals. "Interpreting Milton to their advantage, Van Anglen argues, the New England elite used him in their formulations of consensualist positions that became key elements of the developing American cultural hegemony. At the same time, restive thinkers from Roger Williams to Walt Whitman read Milton's works and career as more averse, thereby endorsing a more romantic, rebellious, and democratic American spirit. After a . . . chapter surveying these conflicts and their consequences between 1620 and the 1780s, Van Anglen focuses upon the Unitarians and the transcendentalists in his remaining chapters. . . . {In} readings of {William Ellery} Channing's review of Milton's De Doctrina, Emerson's essay 'John Milton,' his poem 'Uriel,' and his 'Divinity School Address,' and Thoreau's A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers and Walden {Van Anglen aims to} demonstrate how each transcended the dualism and contradictions of cultural authority." (New England Quarterly). Currently in print at $59.

$40.00






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