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click to enlarge Barrow, Charles Kelly; J. H. Segars, & R. B. Rosenburg (eds). , BLACK CONFEDERATES. NEW copy. Trade paperback. (Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Co). 6x9. 34 b/w photos, 4 illustrations, notes, bibliography, index, 208 pages.

~~~ Neither Confederate history nor black studies can afford to ignore the efforts of black Americans on the side of the Confederacy, as this seemingly contradictory behavior reveals and underscores the terrible complexity of the War Between the States. To quote Edward Smith, Dean of Minority Affairs in the August, 1991 edition of The Civil War News: "To admit that blacks actually fought for a cause which in the minds of many 20th century Americans now stands exclusively for slavery and oppression is unacceptable to many in the country concerned with only politics and not with the historical record."
~~~ This volume reflects an effort to restore some accuracy to the historical record with regard to black soldiers who fought for the Confederacy. Through correspondence, military records, narrative reminiscences, and newspaper accounts from these brave men who served what they considered their country, we hope to discover not only that they did fight, but also how they fought to restore honor to the fallen among them.

$17.95





click to enlarge Barrow, Charles Kelly & J. H. Segars (eds). , BLACK SOUTHERNERS IN CONFEDERATE ARMIES: A Collection of Historical Accounts. NEW copy. Trade paperback. (Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Co). 6x9. 35 photos, 232 pages.

~~~ Little has been written about the military role of African Americans in military campaigns of the United States despite the fact that men and women of color were involved in all national conflicts beginning with the Revolutionary War. Indeed, the thought of black men and women serving the Confederacy during the Civil War is difficult for some to believe because it appears to be a paradox. Yet the surviving narratives, writings of Civil War veterans and their family members, county histories, newspaper articles, personal correspondence, and recorded tributes to black Confederates, offer heartfelt sentiments and historical information that cannot be ignored—and demonstrate that they did serve the Confederacy as soldiers, bodyguards, sailors, construction workers, cooks, and teamsters.
~~~ Since his 1995 publication of Forgotten Confederates: An Anthology about Black Southerners, author Charles Kelly Barrow has continued to collect source material for this second volume. Subscribers of Confederate Veteran magazine responded to Barrow’s classified ads, and excerpts from other publications such as the Journal of Negro History (Vol. IV, July 1919) and Smithsonian Magazine (March 1979) are included here. One excerpt includes the surprising testimony by black Confederate Eddie Brown Page III for the U.S. District Court that helped determine if the Confederate battle emblem should be removed from the Georgia state flag. After Sergeant Page’s testimony, the case was later dismissed.
~~~ Full of surprising anecdotes, eloquent statements, tragic testaments, and admirable accounts of those blacks who fought for and with the South, this collection deserves a place on the shelf of anyone interested in the Civil War’s lesser known aspects.

$18.95





Berry, Stephen W., ALL THAT MAKES A MAN: Love and Ambition in the Civil War South. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004). 304 pages.
~~~ In May 1861, Jefferson Davis issued a general call for volunteers for the Confederate Army. Men responded in such numbers that 200,000 had to be turned away. Few of these men would have attributed their zeal to the cause of states' rights or slavery. As All That Makes a Man: Love and Ambition in the Civil War South makes clear, most southern men saw the war more simply as a test of their manhood, a chance to defend the honor of their sweethearts, fiances, and wives back home. ~~~ Drawing upon diaries and personal letters, Stephen Berry seamlessly weaves together the stories of six very different men, detailing the tangled roles that love and ambition played in each man's life. Their writings reveal a male-dominated Southern culture that exalted women as "repositories of divine grace" and treasured romantic love as the platform from which men launched their bids for greatness. The exhilarating onset of war seemed to these, and most southern men, a grand opportunity to fulfill their ambition for glory and to prove their love for women--on the same field of battle. As the realities of the war became apparent, however, the letters and diaries turned from idealized themes of honor and country to solemn reflections on love and home. ~~~ Elegant and poetic, All That Makes a Man recovers the emotional lives of unsung Southern men and women and reveals that the fiction of Cold Mountain mirrors a poignant reality. In their search for a cause worthy of their lives, many Southern soldiers were disappointed in their hopes for a Southern nation. But they still had their women's love, and there they would rebuild.

$24.95



click to enlarge Blount, Jr., Russell W. , THE BATTLES OF NEW HOPE CHURCH. NEW copy. Trade paperback. (Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Co). 6x9. 15 b/w photos, 3 illusrations, 3 maps, notes, bibliography, index 176 pages.

~~~ This history details the battles that took place in Paulding County, Georgia, during the last week of May 1864. The action begins when Union general William T. Sherman attacks Atlanta and finds himself engulfed in a patch of dense woods known as the Hell Hole, face to face with Joe Johnston’s Army of Tennessee. The series of skirmishes that ensued, which include New Hope Church, Pickett’s Mill, and Dallas, comprise a significant phase of the Atlanta Campaign.
~~~ Fourteen chapters contain meticulously researched information on the weeklong battle and describe the grim realities of trench warfare. Through letters, soldiers lament on the miserable conditions caused by life in the trenches. The author discusses the strategies employed and introduces the major characters behind each conflict.
~~~ In-depth portrayals of General Sherman, “Fighting Joe” Hooker, and Patrick Cleburne, the best general in Johnston’s army, accompany candid memoirs and diary entries from soldiers at war. Written in the present tense, the book captures the intensity of war, enabling readers to experience the action.

$25.00




COMPLETE BOOK OF CONFEDERATE TRIVIA.. Burd Street Press, 1996., NEW copy. Large trade paperback. Publisher's card laid in. Over 4000 questions & answers. 357 pp.

$35.00


Conrad, James Lee, THE YOUNG LIONS: Confederate Cadets at War. NEW copy. Hardcover in dust jacket. Stackpole Books, 1997. First Edition. Maps, engravings, photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 198 pages. From the Library Journal: "The Virginia Military Academy, which later became the Virginia Military Institute (VMI); the South Carolina Military Academy; the Georgia Military Academy; and the University of Alabama Corps of Cadets all served a vital role in preparing raw recruits for the military. They also served as de facto "West Points" for the South, and their graduates made up the majority of Confederate field officers. This is a detailed history of these schools and their role in the Civil War. It is also a very readable account of the problems involved in keeping the schools open during the war and the part that young students played. Conrad, a graduate of VMI, has divided his work in sections by year, and within each year he gives a detailed account of events at each institution, as well as any engagements in which its cadets participated."

$25.00

Crabb, Alfred Leland, DINNER AT BELMONT: A Novel of Captured Nashville. The Bobbs Merrill Company, 1942. VG/VG. First Edition. Some chipping & small pieces missing from spine ends & corners of dust jacket, but colors unfaded. Jacket in mylar protector. Book itself a little dingy, but in good overall condition. Price clipped. 385 pages. Author's first book, a novel of antebellum and wartime Nashville, which portrays five dinners from 1858 to 1865.

$65.00


[Cunningham] Simpson, John A. S.A. CUNNINGHAM AND THE CONFEDERATE HERITAGE . Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994. Fine in near fine dust jacket. Grey boards. First edition.
~~~ "This is the first full-length biography of Sumner Archibald Cunningham (1843-1913), a central figure of the Lost Cause movement in the post-Civil War South. The focus of John A. Simpson's study is on Cunningham's career as founder, owner, and editor of one of the New South's most influential magazines, the Nashville-based Confederate Veteran. Reared on a prosperous farm in middle Tennessee, Cunningham signed on in 1861 at age eighteen, as a private in the 41st Tennessee Infantry. He fought in several battles, was captured, and escaped to fight again. By the end of his enlistment, he had risen to the rank of sergeant-major. Like so many of his peers, Cunningham's pivotal life experience was his Confederate service. The collective trauma of war and defeat, combined with what Cunningham assessed as a personally 'inglorious' military record, drove his obsessive involvement in helping to form and then defend the most historically palatable image possible of the Southern cause. In 1871, after several moderately successful years as a mercantilist in his hometown of Shelbyville, Tennessee, Cunningham purchased a local newspaper and began his forty-two-year career in journalism. Using his position of high visibility to help raise funds for a monument to Jefferson Davis, Cunningham soon became the fund's general agent. From there he rose to the forefront of the movement to sanctify Confederate veteranhood. At his death in 1913, Cunningham was eulogized across the South for his zealous dedication to the Confederate heritage. His story, which enriches our understanding of the ongoing cultural phenomenon of the Lost Cause, also depicts one man's personal struggle to rationalize his wartime inadequacies during an era of intense mythologizing."
~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$25.00


Davis, Edwin Adams, FALLEN GUIDON: The Saga of Confederate General Jo Shelby's March to Mexico. Texas A&M., NEW, still in shrinkwrap. Hardcover with dust jacket (white discoloration showing around edges of jacket are from shrinkwrap and are not on the jacket itself). 1 b&w photo, 16 line drawings, 2 maps, 192 pp. "The last organized unit of the Confederate army refused to surrender, and the story of their effort to transplant Southern ideals in Mexico gives new understanding into the attitudes of those men who returned to their homes after the Civil War and to the poverty and the pride that led to the cattle drive era."

$27.00







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Early, LtGen Jubal A., A MEMOIR OF THE LAST YEAR OF THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE, in the Confederate States of America, containing an Account of the Operations of His Commands in the Years 1864 and 1865. NEW copy. (Harrisburg, PA: Archive Society, 1996). Facsimile reprint of original 1867 Charles W. Button edition. Finely bound in gray leatherette with stamped decorations, gilt inlays and gilt edges. Marbled endpages. Sewn binding. Extensive page-end notes, appendix, 135 pages.
~~~ This edition OUT OF PRINT.


$65.00




Fletcher, William A., REBEL PRIVATE: Front and Rear. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Plume Books). 223 pages.
~~~ First published in 1907, the memoirs of a former Confederate soldier who fought at Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, Second Mannassas, and Chickamunga reveal the ground-level perspective of a Civil War private.

$20.00








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Furgurson, Ernest B., ASHES OF GLORY: Richmond at War. NF/NF. Remainder dot on bottom of book (page edges). (NY: Knopf, 1997). Third printing. Map, photographs, extensive notes & bibliography, index, 419 pp.
~~~ From Kirkus Reviews: "In a real contribution to the literature on the Civil War, Furgurson (Chancellorsville, 1863) paints a lively portrait of the Confederacy's first city in wartime. Before the Civil War, Richmond, Virginia, the state capital, was a prosperous city; during the war, it served as the South's administrative capital, military headquarters, and principal industrial center. As a result, Richmond was under almost constant threat from Federal armies. In the early years of the war, the citizenry of Richmond exhibited enthusiasm for the Confederate cause, tempered with nervousness during various Union invasions. After Grant launched his 1864 campaign to subdue the Southern capital, the city developed a siege mentality that ultimately sapped the will of the South. As a result, in a metamorphosis that was a mirror image of Lincoln's in the North, the popularity of Jefferson Davis waned through the war, until the man who once could not walk through Richmond without being mobbed could ride through the streets of the capital without so much as a cheer. As Davis's western military effort collapsed, the war became more and more a fight to preserve Richmond. Also, Furgurson shows that the struggle for mastery of Richmond reached inside the capital, where Union sympathizers and Federal spies worked to undermine the Confederate government and give aid and comfort to the large numbers of Northern prisoners there, interned at the notorious Libby and Belle Isle prisons. While most Unionists made modest contributions, one spy, Elizabeth Van Lew, was acknowledged by generals Butler and Grant to have given valuable information to the Union side throughout the war. The author points out that the Confederate war effort survived the fall of the other major Southern cities -— New Orleans, Mobile, Atlanta -— but ended immediately when the rebel government abandoned Richmond. A well-conceived, finely drawn portrait of wartime Richmond."

$30.00


(Gildersleeve) Ward W. Briggs (ed), SOLDIER AND SCHOLAR: Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve and the Civil War. NEW copy, hard cover with dust jacket. (University of Virginia Press, 1998). Photographs, 448 pages.
~~~ One of America's greatest classical scholars, Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve (1831-1924) was also a Civil War journalist. Born in Charleston, South Carolina, and a self-described "southerner beyond dispute," he received his doctorate in Germany and returned to America an enthusiastic advocate of Greek scholarship. Like every male member of his immediate family (including his father), Gildersleeve enlisted after Fort Sumter, but he continued to teach at the University of Virginia during the winters. Frequenting Richmond during the war, this young intellectual and passionate partisan who found the war, with its attendant social and political issues, as stimulating as his beloved classics. In Soldier and Scholar, editor Ward Briggs has assembled a revealing collection of Gildersleeve's writings: autobiographical essays, sixty-three editorials he wrote for the Richmond Examiner during the war, and a series of his reflections upon the causes and effects of the Civil War thirty years later. Unlike published Civil War diaries, the editorials do not merely record daily occurrences and impressions; they analyze military, social, economic, and political events, setting them in a larger ethical and historical context. Infused with the rhetoric of Gildersleeve's classical training, these pieces are frequently vitriolic attacks not only on the evil and immoral Yankees, miscegenation, Jews, and critics of slavery, but also on Jefferson Davis, his hapless Confederate administration, and the struggling Southern armies.
~~~ From Booknews: "In assembling Gildersleeve's writings -- autobiographical, newspaper editorials, and Southern essays, Briggs brings to light the reflections of a University of Virginia classics scholar during the Civil War. His classical rhetoric lends a novel twist to his loyalist but critical views on the South's 'Good Cause,' in chastising the Confederate administration as well as critics of slavery and Yankee poet 'sinners' against the English language."
~~~ Currently in print at $55.00.

$45.00


(Gorgas), Frank E. Vandiver, PLOUGHSHARES INTO SWORDS: Josiah Gorgas and Confederate Ordnance. (Texas A&M, 1994). NEW copy, still in shrink-wrap. 349 pages.
~~~ A study of the life and Civil War record of Josiah Gorgas, a West Point graduate of the class of 1840 who entered the Union Ordnance Corps and defected to the Confederacy. Vandiver (president emeritus, Texas A&M U.) draws on numerous unpublished sources for this narrative, first published in 1952.

$35.00


(Grisamore), Bergeron, Arthur W., Jr. (ed), THE CIVIL WAR REMINISCENCES OF MAJOR SILAS T. GRISAMORE, C.S.A.. (Louisiana State University Press, 1993). NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. Photographs, maps, notes, bibliography, index.

$25.00


(Hampton), Manly Wade Wellman, GIANT IN GRAY: A Biography of Wade Hampton of South Carolina. NF/NF. Jacket in mylar. (Dayton: Press of Morningside Bookshop, 1988). Facsimile reprint of original 1949 Scribner's edition. Photographic plates, notes, bibliography, index, 387 pages.
~~~ Wade Hampton was one of only three men promoted to the rank of lieutenant general in the Confederate army without a formal military education. Despite his lack of training, Hampton's presence would be profoundly felt at many battles, including First Manassas, the Peninsula Campaign, GEttysburg, and Petersburg. ~~~ Before the onset of the war, Hampton was widely known to be one of the most wealthy men in the South. He raised and equipped the Hampton Legion at his own expense, and left his home in Charleston, South Carolina, for Virginia, where he was seriously wounded in the battle of First Manassas. ~~~ Hampton would also suffer a severe head wound iat the battle of Gettysburg. Weary after an all night march, his brigade, made up of the 1st North Carolina, the 2st and 2nd South Carolina, the Jeff Davis Legion and Georgea legions of Cobb and Phillips, arrived at Gettysburg on the second day. They suffered heavy losses in a fight against BrigGen Judson Kilpatrick's divisions and on the third day met the cavalry brigades of Col J. Irvin Gregg and BrigGen George A. Custer. Hampton's Confederate cavalry did not, however, lay down without a fight; Pennsylvania Capt William Miller would later write, "A grander spectacle than their advance has seldom been beheld." ~~~ Hampton was appointed commander of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia after the death of MajGen J.E.B. Stuart. He served General Lee in this capacity until the Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House. ~~~ After the War, Hampton was elected twice to the Governorship of South Carolina, and then to the US Senate. He was commissioner of Pacific Railways until his death in 1902.
~~~ OUT OF PRINT; increasingly difficult to find.

$55.00


Inscoe, John C. and Gordon B. McKinney, THE HEART OF CONFEDERATE APPALACHIA: Western North Carolina in the Civil War. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of North Carolina Press, 2000). 384 pages.
~~~ In the mountains of western North Carolina, the Civil War was fought on different terms than those found throughout most of the South. Though relatively minor strategically, incursions by both Confederate and Union troops disrupted life and threatened the social stability of many communities. Even more disruptive were the internal divisions among western Carolinians themselves. Differing ideologies turned into opposing loyalties, and the resulting strife proved as traumatic as anything imposed by outside armies. As the mountains became hiding places for deserters, draft dodgers, fugitive slaves, and escaped prisoners of war, the conflict became a more localized and internalized guerrilla war, less rational and more brutal, mean-spirited, and personal--and ultimately more demoralizing and destructive. ~~~ From the valleys of the French Broad and Catawba Rivers to the peaks of the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountains, the people of western North Carolina responded to the war in dramatically different ways. Men and women, masters and slaves, planters and yeoman, soldiers and civilians, Confederates and Unionists, bushwhackers and home guardsmen, Democrats and Whigs--all their stories are told here.
~~~ Currently in print at $39.95.

$35.00







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Johnston, Joseph E., General, C.S.A, NARRATIVE OF MILITARY OPERATIONS, DIRECTED DURING THE LATE WAR BETWEEN THE STATES. NEW copy. A speck-sized flaw in the leatherette on the rear cover, evidently from time of manufacture, as it does not appear to be an injury, and there is no danger of its increasing in size. A half-inch slight scrape to bottom edge of front cover where it sits on shelf. Book is otherwise pristine. (Harrisburg, PA: Archive Society, 1995). Facsimile reprint of original 1874 D. Appleton edition. Finely bound in gray leatherette with elaborate stamped decorations, gilt inlays and gilt edges. Gray marbled endpages. Sewn binding. Illustrated with superb steel-engraving portraits and maps. Occasional page-end notes, A seventy-page appendix of field-orders and dispatches. 602 pages. A truly majestic book.
~~~        Petty considerations over rank and military etiquette and wounds cost the Confederacy, for lengthy periods, the services of one of its most effective, top commanders, Joseph E. Johnston. The Virginia native and West Pointer (1829), rated by many as more capable than Lee, was the highest-ranking regular army officer to resign and join the Confederacy. With the staff rank of brigadier general, he had been the national army's quartermaster general for almost a year when he quit on April 22, 1861.      ~~~         His earlier career had included eight years in the artillery before he was transferred to the topographical engineers in 1838, when he rejoined the army a year after his resignation. During the Mexican War he won two brevets and was wounded at both Cerro Gordo and Chapultepec. He had also been brevetted for earlier service against the Seminoles in Florida. Having been appointed quartermaster general on June 28, 1860, he remained in the service until after the secession of his native state.      ~~~       His Virginia and Confederate assignments included: major general, Virginia Volunteers (April 1861); brigadier general, CSA (May 14, 1861); commanding Army of the Shenandoah June 30 - July 20, 1861); commanding Army of the Potomac July 20 - October 22,1861); general, CSA (August 31, 1861, to rank from July 21); commanding Department of Northern Virginia (October 22, 1861 - May 31, 1862); commanding Department of the West (December 4, 1862 - December 1863); commanding Army of Tennessee (December 27, 1863 - July 18, 1864); commanding Army of Tennessee and Department of Tennessee and Georgia (February 25 - April 26, 1865); also commanding Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida (February 25 - April 26, 1865); and also commanding Department of North Carolina (March 16 - April 26, 1865).   ~~~     Initially commissioned in the Virginia forces, he relieved Thomas J. (later "Stonewall")Jackson in command at Harpers Ferry and continued the organization of the Army of the Shenandoah. When the Virginia forces were absorbed into the Confederate army he was reduced to a brigadier generalship.        ~~~         When the Union army under Irvin McDowell moved out of Washington and Alexandria to attack Pierre G.T. Beauregard at Manassas, Johnston managed to totally fool Pennsylvania General Robert Patterson with a small force in the Shenandoah Valley and move the bulk of his forces to Beauregard's support. During the battle of lst Bull Run, Johnston, although senior to Beauregard, left the general direction of the battle to the junior officer due to a lack of familiarity with the terrain. Johnston was basically engaged in forwarding freshly arrived Valley troops to the threatened sectors. The two generals shared the glory and were critical of supply problems which they felt prevented a march on Washington.       ~~~         The next month Johnston became one of five men advanced to the grade of full general-all Confederate generals wore the same insignia of rank, three stars in a wreath-but was not pleased with the relative ranking of the five. He felt that since he was the senior officer to leave the "Old" service and join the Confederacy he should not be ranked behind Samuel Cooper, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee. Only Beauregard was placed behind Johnston on the list. This led to much bad blood between Johnston and Jefferson Davis. There would be more.      ~~~         With his increased rank, Johnston was given command of the Department of Northern Virginia and became engaged in what was virtually a phony war with the Washington-based army of George B. McClellan. Throughout the winter of 1861-62 he maintained his position at Manassas junction and then withdrew just as McClellan's superior force advanced. In the meantime he had engaged in a dispute with his president over a policy of brigading troops from the same state together. Johnston argued that a reorganization could not with propriety be carried out in the face of an active enemy.      ~~~           When he withdrew his army from the line of Bull Run he reinforced John B. Magruder on the Peninsula east of Richmond and took command there. With McClellan again facing him, he held Yorktown for a month before pulling back just before his opponent again advanced. His forces fought a rearguard action at Williamsburg and were then encamped on the very outskirts of the new nation's capital. In an effort to drive McClellan off, Johnston launched an attack south of the Chickahominy River at the end of May 1862. The battle of Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks, turned out to be a confusion of errors in the confusing terrain. For years afterwards there was acrimonious debate among various Confederate generals over who was to blame for the limited success.      ~~~           On the first day of the battle Johnston re-exhibited his tendency to attract enemy bullets and was succeeded the next day by Robert E. Lee who was to lead the Army of Northern Virginia for the balance of the war. Upon his recovery he was given charge of a largely supervisory command entitled the Department of the West. He was in charge of Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee and John C. Pemberton's Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. With few troops under his immediate command he proved powerless in attempting to relieve the besieged garrison of Vicksburg under Pemberton.      ~~~           Following the river city's fall, he made a feeble attempt to hold Jackson, Mississippi, against the advance of William T. Sherman. Following Bragg's disastrous defeat at Chattanooga, Johnston was given immediate command of his army and the next spring and summer directed a masterful delaying campaign against Sherman during his advance on Atlanta. However, his continued withdrawals raised the ire of Jefferson Davis, and he was relieved in front of the city.  
        His successor, John B. Hood, then began his destruction of the Army of Tennessee with reckless tactics. With Sherman having marched clear through Georgia and begun his drive through the Carolinas, a clamor arose in the Confederate Congress for johnston's resumption of command. Davis finally relented in early 1865 and the general took eventual command of three departments. Unfortunately for the Confederacy his forces were heavy on generals but weak on men. He could do little but hope for a linkup with Lee's army so that they could turn on either Grant or Sherman and then on the other. It never came off and he surrendered his forces following some difficulties over terms, bordering on the political, on April 26, 1865, at the Bennett House near Durham Station, North Carolina. He had been one of the most effective Confederate commanders when he was not hampered by directives from the president.
        Following the war he sat in Congress and was a federal railroad commissioner. Engaged in much debate over the causes of the Confederate defeat, he wrote his Narrative of Military Operations which was highly critical of Davis and many of his fellow generals. In an example of the civil relationships between former wartime opponents, Johnston died of a cold caught while attending the funeral of his arch-opponent, Sherman.
~~~ This edition OUT OF PRINT.

$110.00



click to enlarge Joslyn, Mauriel Phillips. , CHARLOTTE'S BOYS: Civil War Letters of the Branch Family of Savannah. NEW copy. Trade paperback. (Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Co). 6x9. 19 b&w photographs, 1 b&w illustration, notes, bibliography, index, 376 pages.

~~~ One of the most complete collections of Civil War correspondence to appear in print, Charlotte’s Boys recounts the fate of Charlotte Branch, her three sons, and their extended family and friends from 1861 through 1866. John, Sanford, and Hamilton Branch’s enlistment in the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Savannah’s militia, left their mother in Georgia with only letters to keep her company. The story of the Branch boys shows the Civil War’s impact on individual soldiers and their families. From John’s burial on the battlefield at First Manassas to Sanford’s wounding and capture at Gettysburg to Hamilton’s involvement until the South’s surrender, this historic compilation of letters follows the three Branch brothers through their most desperate and victorious moments of the war.
~~~ On a larger scale, Charlotte’s Boys shows the dedication and loyalty of Savannah’s citizens to each other, their city, and their cause during the Civil War. More than a portrait of a single family’s experience, this anthology depicts the trauma endured by Savannah herself. Through the Branch boys, readers are offered a revealing look at military and civilian struggles during the war to an extent that has never before been seen.
~~~ The letters of the Branch boys, their mother, and their family and friends have been borrowed from the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Georgia in Athens. The included maps, artifacts, and Branch family photographs are held in the Atlanta History Center.

$29.95




Jones, Virgil Carrington, GRAY GHOSTS AND REBEL RAIDERS. VG/VG--. Jacket chipped at top front panel and head of spine; 2-inch closed tear at heel of spine; price-clipped. Book itself is clean and tight. (NY: Henry Holt & Co, 1956). First Edition. Maps on end-pages, photographs, extensive notes, index, 431 pages.
~~~ The most definitive volume on guerrilla warfare during the Civil War features a foreword by the distinguished scholar Bruce Catton and 22 photos and maps. Gray Ghosts introduces a cast of daring and dashing Southern soldiers: John Singleton Mosby, Turner Ashby, and Harry Gilmore, among others. These men used irregular troops and even more irregular methods against the invading Union Army. A fast-paced narrative describes daredevil acts performed by these small, bold bands of fighters, and shows how, over and over again, they managed to thwart Union efforts. Defiant to the end, the "gray ghosts" and rebel raiders resisted surrender after Appomattox and continued to fight until all hope was gone.
~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$45.00








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[Maxey] Waugh, John L. SAM BELL MAXEY AND THE CONFEDERATE INDIANS. (Abilene: McWhiney. 1998). VG+. TRADE paperback. Illustrations. 1st edition.
~~~ General Maxey, dignified, articulate, and confident, arrives in Indian Territory in 1863 to assume command of a diverse and motley army of Indians. The troops are in disarray; they are suspicious of tribal alliances, weakened from malnutrition, their crops have been pillaged, and they are discouraged by a series of battlefield setbacks at the hands of the Union Army invading from Kansas. Maxey calls upon all of his leadership and administrative skills and his insight into Indian culture to win the confidence and loyalty of these soldiers. Desperately he fights to secure badly needed munitions and provisions from the Confederate bureaucracy, which is focused on the plight of its eastern armies. All the while he struggles with his own field commander, the able and ambitious Douglas Cooper, friend of Jefferson Davis, who is eager to supplant him. Yet, Maxey perseveres and succeeds in molding this "army without infantry" into an effective fighting force that plays an important role in the Red River and Arkansas Campaigns and ultimately helps prevent a Union invasion of north Texas. A little known story, dramatically told by a distinguished author.

$15.00







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McArthur, Judith N. and Orville Vernon Burton, A GENTLEMAN AND AN OFFICER. Oxford, 1996., NEW copy. Trade paperback. Extensive notes, appendices, index, 362 pages.
~~~ "A remarkable collection of eighty previously unpublished Civil War letters which provide both a penetrating look at the middle ranks from the Virginia and South Carolina fronts as well as an intensely personal drama both on the home front and the Peninsula battlefield." Covers the entire Civil War from Fort Sumter to Reconstruction.

$15.00

(McLaws), John C. Oeffinger (ed), A SOLDIER'S GENERAL: The Civil War Letters of Major General Lafayette McLaws. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of North Carolina Press, 2002). 320 pages.
~~~ During his service in the Confederate army, Major General Lafayette McLaws (1821-1897) served under and alongside such famous officers as Robert E. Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, James Longstreet, and John B. Hood. He played a significant role in some of the most crucial battles of the Civil War, including Harpers Ferry, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. A prolific letter writer, McLaws left behind a wealth of handwritten material documenting his experiences before and during the war. Despite all this, no biography of McLaws or history of his division has ever been published. In effect, says John Oeffinger, the public has all but forgotten one of the first major generals appointed in the Army of Northern Virginia. A Soldier's General gathers ninety-five letters written by McLaws to his wife and other family members between 1858 and 1865, making these rich sources available to a wide audience for the first time. The letters, painstakingly transcribed from McLaws's notoriously poor handwriting, contain a wealth of opinion and information about life and morale in the Confederate army, Civil War-era politics, the impact of war on the Confederate home front, the Southern press, and a man's efforts to advise and remain connected with his wife and children while engaged in a distant conflict. Among the fascinating threads woven through the letters is the story of McLaws's fractured relationship with childhood friend Longstreet, who had McLaws relieved of command in 1863. (McLaws ultimately demanded a court-martial to restore his honor).
~~~ Currently in print at $39.95.

$35.00


Neely, Mark E., Harold Holzer and Gabor S. Boritt, THE CONFEDERATE IMAGE: Prints of the Lost Cause. NEW copy, oversized paperback. (University of North Carolina Press, 2000). 288 pages.
~~~ The Confederate Image examines for the first time the popular lithographs and engravings cherished by Southerners after the Civil War. Until now, few of the pictures have been reproduced in books, and many have been relegated to dusty corners of museums, unframed and uncataloged. This book establishes the importance of such prints, for they helped revive and sustain Southern identity after the collapse of the Confederacy. If the myth of the Lost Cause was a Southern civil religion, then this book is a study of its icons.
~~~ From Publishers Weekly: "In part because historians have preferred to use photographs to illustrate the Civil War and partly because the South's heat and humidity destroyed many extant copies, the popular lithographs and engravings of the `Lost Cause' have been neglected, even by museums, where they frequently were stored unframed, uncatalogued and unrepaired. Here print historians Neely, Holzer and Boritt offer a wide selection of such prints (141 in total), which, ironically, mainly were produced by Northern printmakers for Southerners who wanted to revive and sustain the region's identity after the Confederate defeat in 1865. Images include heroes, martyrs and emblems of the Confederacy and are presented in varying size and quality `beautiful pictures, crude and ugly ones, large ones and small, maudlin scenes and inspiring ones.' In this pioneering study, the authors provide an extensively researched, scholarly text that places this popular art in its cultural and commercial context."
~~~ From Library Journal: "Southerners provided a ready market for those who made inexpensive prints of Confederate heroes. Ironically, the authors find that most of these surviving pictures produced from 1865 to the early 1900s were manufactured in the North by profit-seeking businessmen, including Currier and Ives. Lost Cause prints were both mementos of past loyalty and inspirational icons for future generations of southerners. This book is imaginative, insightful, and well written. It crosses several fields: analysis of art, printing, 19th-century popular culture, and Civil War history."
~~~ This paperback edition formerly in print at $39.95, now OUT OF PRINT.

$45.00



click to enlarge Phelps, W. Chris. , CHARLESTONIANS AT WAR: The Charleston Battalion. NEW copy. Trade paperback. (Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Co). 5.5x8.5. 17 b&w photographs, 3 b&w illustrations, 8 maps, appendices, notes, bibliography, index, 265 pages.

~~~ At the outbreak of the Civil War, Charleston, as the site where the Ordinance of Secession was signed, faced the full wrath of Union forces. In response, the Charleston Battalion, comprised of volunteers from all strata of local society, formed a loyal, effective fighting unit. They served with distinction in several campaigns in Virginia and North Carolina and defended their hometown against Union invaders. Local author W. Chris Phelps explores the formation and the many campaigns of this diverse group of Charleston citizens led by Peter Charles Gaillard. The battalion distinguished itself by defeating overwhelming Union assaults against Charleston at Secessionville in 1862 and Battery Wagner in 1863 and later performed gallantly in the defense of Petersburg in 1864 and Wilmington in 1865.
~~~ Through Charlestonians in War, these brave men finally receive their due. W. Chris Phelps describes the origins of the battalion and focuses on its capable commander, Peter Charles Gaillard, who later became mayor. In-depth studies of the battalion’s various battles, at home and away, are also included.

$22.00





click to enlarge Phelps, W. Chris. , THE BOMBARDMENT OF CHARLESTON: 1863-1865. NEW copy. Trade paperback. (Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Co). 6x9. 5 illustrations, 12 b&w photographs, 7 maps, 176 pages.

~~~ Little has been written about the military role of African Americans in military campaigns of the United States despite the fact that men and women of color were involved in all national conflicts beginning with the Revolutionary War. Indeed, the thought of black men and women serving the Confederacy during the Civil War is difficult for some to believe because it appears to be a paradox. Yet the surviving narratives, writings of Civil War veterans and their family members, county histories, newspaper articles, personal correspondence, and recorded tributes to black Confederates, offer heartfelt sentiments and historical information that cannot be ignored—and demonstrate that they did serve the Confederacy as soldiers, bodyguards, sailors, construction workers, cooks, and teamsters.
~~~ Since his 1995 publication of Forgotten Confederates: An Anthology about Black Southerners, author Charles Kelly Barrow has continued to collect source material for this second volume. Subscribers of Confederate Veteran magazine responded to Barrow’s classified ads, and excerpts from other publications such as the Journal of Negro History (Vol. IV, July 1919) and Smithsonian Magazine (March 1979) are included here. One excerpt includes the surprising testimony by black Confederate Eddie Brown Page III for the U.S. District Court that helped determine if the Confederate battle emblem should be removed from the Georgia state flag. After Sergeant Page’s testimony, the case was later dismissed.
~~~ Full of surprising anecdotes, eloquent statements, tragic testaments, and admirable accounts of those blacks who fought for and with the South, this collection deserves a place on the shelf of anyone interested in the Civil War’s lesser known aspects.

$15.00




(Pryor), John C. Waugh, SURVIVING THE CONFEDERACY: Rebellion, Ruin, and Recovery--Roger and Sara Pryor During the Civil War. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Harcourt, 2002). 464 pages.
~~~ From Publishers Weekly: Roger Pryor was an influential Virginia newspaper editor and politician before the war and a Democratic congressman in Washington until he resigned as the Southern states began to secede. His 'fair lady,' as he first addressed her, was the former Sara Agnes Rice, whose family had been in Virginia since 1680. Waugh (The Class of 1846) bases this engaging account of their lives and times in part on Roger's correspondence and on two memoirs that Sara wrote after the war. Commanding the Third Virginia regiment during the Civil War, Roger competently led through the Seven Days, Second Manassas and Antietam, where he was elevated to division command and failed terribly. He was relegated to a secondary command and eventually resigned in disgust, reenlisting as a private in a Virginia cavalry regiment. Captured at Petersburg in 1864, he was imprisoned in a New York fort until released in early 1865. While he was away from home, Sara coped with six children, scraping by for food, clothing and shelter during her long stay in the Petersburg area, but keeping the family intact. In late 1865, Roger went to New York City, invited by friends he had known before the war. He became a lawyer, struggled for several years, then made enough money to bring his family to the city, forging a successful legal career (and making speeches noting that he was glad the South lost and the nation was now reunited) before retiring in 1899. Waugh describes vividly the society in which the Pryors moved and their struggles during the war, but the reconstructed dialogue and breathless descriptions ('Sara's heart pounded as she read the telegram from Roger in Norfolk in May,' begins one chapter) may deter the more historically minded."
~~~ From Library Journal: "Award-winning author Waugh (The Class of 1846; Reelecting Lincoln) takes us deep into the heart of Dixie in this life-and-times dual biography of the Pryors Virginia secessionists, ardent Confederates, and postwar Unionists. Roger Pryor made his name first as a fire-eating editor, then as a soldier, and finally as a lawyer, each of which positions allowed the Pryors to move in the highest social circles in antebellum Washington, DC, wartime Richmond, and postwar New York City. Waugh describes in great detail the travails of a family separated by war, the petticoat politics of the Confederate capital, the privations and despair of retreat and defeat, and the difficulties of leaving the South and finding a new life in the North. Waugh's accounts of battles and leaders do not redraw what we already know of the Virginia campaigns, but his vivid portrayals of private lives at war match anything in print. Waugh overdramatizes by including dialog and imputing motives to actions that the sources do not wholly sustain, and he sees the world uncritically from the Pryors' eyes. But in the Pryors he has found the couple he was seeking to retell the war. Not since Robert Manson Myers's Pulitzer Prize-winning Children of Pride has a white Southern family come so fully and fiercely to life."

$28.00

Richardson, James D., A COMPILATION OF THE MESSAGES AND PAPERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, INCLUDING THE DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE, 1861-1865. Two volumes, NEW. (The Archive Society, 1996) . Facsimile of the 1905 edition by the United States Publishing Company, Nashville. "Published by permission of Congress by James D. Richardson, a Representative from the State of Tennessee, compiler and editior of 'Messages and Papers of the President'". Finely bound in gray leatherette with gilt inlays and gilt edges. Marbled endpapers. Photographs, engravings, index. Vol I: 643 pages. Vol II: 760 pages.
~~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$125.00



Rollins, Richard, "THE DAMNED RED FLAGS OF THE REBELLION" . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Redondo Beach, CA: Rank and File Publications, 1997). Illustrations, maps, diagrams, tables, 38 color plates of individual battle flags, appendices, index, 262 pages.
~~~ The Confederate battle flag was arguably the most powerful symbol produced during the Civil War. Confederate flags incorporated the language of color, shape, design, and inscription, weaving them into a new icon that offered a material and highly visible representation of the differences between North and South. In this unique study, Richard Rollins outlines the meaning Confederate battle flags had for both sides, details their deep roots in the American experience, and analyzes their use in combat. A special section includes 41 full-color photographs of flags captured during the Gettysburg campaign.

$19.95



click to enlarge [Smith} Scott L. Mingus Sr. CONFEDERATE GENERAL WILLIAM "EXTRA BILLY" SMITH: From Virginia's Statehouse to Gettysburg Scapegoat. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Savas Beatie, 2013). 6x9, 27 photographs, 14 maps, 336 pages.
~~~ William “Extra Billy” Smith, the oldest and one of the most controversial Confederate generals on the field at Gettysburg, was also one of the most colorful and charismatic characters of the Civil War and the antebellum Old South. Despite a life full of drama, politics, and adventure, until now no full-length biography of this former general, governor, and attorney existed, other than a biased account in the 19th century by his brother-in-law. Scott L. Mingus Sr. has ably filled this historical void with Confederate General William “Extra Billy” Smith: From Virginia’s Statehouse to Gettysburg Scapegoat.
~~~ Known nationally as “Extra Billy” because of his prewar penchant for finding loopholes in government postal contracts to gain extra money for his stagecoach lines, Smith served as Virginia’s governor during both the War with Mexico and the Civil War, served five terms in the U.S. Congress, and was one of Virginia’s leading spokesmen for slavery and States’ Rights. Extra Billy’s extra-long speeches and wry sense of humor were legendary among his peers. A lawyer during the heady Gold Rush days, Smith made a fortune in California and, like his income earned from stagecoaches, quickly lost it.
~~~ Despite his advanced age Smith took the field and fought well at First Manassas, was wounded at Seven Pines and again at Sharpsburg, and marched with Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania. There, on the first day at Gettysburg, Smith’s frantic messages about a possible Union flanking attack remain a matter of controversy to this day. Did his aging eyes see distant fence-lines that he interpreted as approaching enemy soldiers—mere phantoms of his imagination?—or did his prompt action stave off a looming Confederate disaster? What we do know is that his calls for support diverted limited Confederate manpower away from attacks against Cemetery Hill and Culp’s Hill that might have turned the tide of Southern fortunes in Pennsylvania.
~~~ Mingus’s biography draws upon a wide array of newspapers, diaries, letters, and other firsthand accounts to paint a broad, deep, and colorful portrait of one of the South’s most interesting leaders and devoted sons. Complete with original maps and photos, Extra Billy Smith will satisfy anyone who loves politics, war, and a great story well told.

$29.95










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(Taylor), Parrish, T. Michael. RICHARD TAYLOR: Soldier Prince of Dixie. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of North Carolina Press, 1992). First Edition. Period illustrations, extensive notes, bibliography, index, 553 pp.
~~~ "The only son of President Zachary Taylor, brother-in-law of Jefferson Davis, Richard Taylor (1826-79) epitomized the ideals of the Old South, graduating from Yale to become a prominant Louisiana sugar planter and influential politician. Aristocratic and self-indulgent, Taylor was widely admired for his intelligence and wit. Like many southern conservatives, he resisted but finally succumbed to secession, fearing the northern abolitionist threat as a greater evil. Taylor joined the South's cause as colonel of the Ninth Louisiana Infantry. Rising to command the famous Louisiana Brigade, he was Stonewall Jackson's most effective brigadier in the 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Promoted at Jackson's behest to major general, Taylor took charge of reviving Louisiana's faltering war effort. For nearly two years he clashed continually with his immediate superior, Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of the Trans-Mississippi Department, especially over the chronic need for troops to resist the devastating effects of total war upon Louisiana civilians. In the spring of 1864 Taylor deliberately ignored Smith's explicit instructions by vigorously repulsing Nathaniel P. Banks's Red River Campaign. Convinced of Smith's arrogant ambition and incompetence, Taylor sought to be relieved, but President Davis instead gave him command of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, with a promotion to lieutenant general. From the autumn of 1864 to war's end, Taylor resisted a relentless succession of Federal invaders, relying mainly on Nathan Bedford Forrest's superb cavalrymen. After the war, Taylor was a powerful exponent of southern conservatism within the national Democratic party's inner circle of leaders. Shortly before his death, he authored Destruction and Reconstruction, a memoir that ranks as one of the most literate and influential memoirs of the Civil War era."

$35.00


Williams, Edward B. (editor), REBEL BROTHERS: The Civil War Letters of the Truehearts. Texas A&M., NEW, still in shrinkwrap. Hardcover with dust jacket. 3 photos, 5 maps, 296 pp. "Letters from brothers who served in many capacities~ from cavalry to ranger to assistant surgeon~ display real literary talent in describing the scenes of war. Some of the letters provide glimpses of Confederate military leaders suich as Robert E. Lee not found elsewhere."

$33.00



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