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Armistead, Gene C. HORSES AND MULES IN THE CIVIL WAR: A Complete History with a Roster of More Than 700 War Horses. . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2013). 7x10, 30 photographs, appendices, notes, bibliography, index.
~~~ Horses and mules served during the Civil War in greater numbers and suffered more casualties than the men of the Union and Confederate armies combined. Using firsthand accounts, the many uses of equines during the war, the methods by which they were obtained, their costs, their suffering on the battlefields and roads, their consumption by soldiers, and racing, mounted music and other themes are all addressed. The book is supplemented by accounts of the "Lightning Mule Brigade," the "Charge of the Mule Brigade," five appendices and 37 illustrations. More than 700 Civil War equines are identified and described with incidental information and identification of their masters.

$49.95



Bacon, Benjamin W., SINEWS OF WAR: How Technology, Industry, and Transportation Won the Civil War. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Random House, 1997). Illustrations, photography, bibliography, index, 246 pages.
~~~ Who were the men whose job it was to move the soldiers, munitions, and supplies where they needed to go, and how did they do it? Now for the first time in the popular literature of the Civil War comes a book that specifically probes the surprisingly fascinating subject of how logistics won the war. In Sinews of War: How Technology, Industry, and Transportation Won the Civil War, Benjamin W. Bacon unravels the story of how massive infantry regiments and artillery were transported hundreds of miles to the battlefield, as well as the equally remarkable details of how the armies made sure the soldiers had enough bullets, clothing, and bandages, and especially, food. Not only did a Civil War-era army march on its stomach, it also kept close to its ammo train, its replacement uniforms, its ambulances, and its horses and mules. The author shows how the Union's engineering marvels, such as building a pontoon bridge over the James River in only seven hours (a bridge strong enough to carry the Army of the Potomac's wagon trains, artillery, and two army corps), made any hope of a Confederate victory impossible. From the calling of volunteers in 1861, to Sherman's final campaigns in the Carolinas, Sinews of War is a must-read for anyone interested in how the Civil War was really won.
~~~ Originally published at $24.95, now OUT OF PRINT.

$30.00












Greene, Laurence, THE RAID: A Biography of Harper's Ferry. VG/VG. Some wear and slight creasing to head and spine of jacket, which is in mylar. Bookplate of previous owner on front endpage. Illustrated (map of Harper's Ferry) on endpages. (NY: Henry Holt & Company, 1953). First Edition. 246 pages.

$30.00



Beck, Janet Kemper, CREATING THE JOHN BROWN LEGEND; Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Child and Higginson in Defense of the Raid on Harper's Ferry. . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009). 7x10, 30 photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 214 pp.
~~~ One of the triggering events of the Civil War helped divide a nation but also launched a cannonade of persuasive essays and propaganda. Early press reaction to John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry ranged from indignant horror in the South to stunned disbelief in the North. Brown’s supporters wielded great power with their pens: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, and Lydia Maria Child. This book explores the moment when literature and history collided and literature rewrote history. This volume features 30 photographs, maps, proclamations and broadsides and a detailed timeline of events surrounding the raid.

$35.00







Crawford, Martin (ed), WILLIAM HOWARD RUSSELL'S CIVIL WAR: Private Diary and Letters, 1861-1862. University of Georgia Press, 1992. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. Photographs, notes, index, 252 pages.
~~~ Russell was a special correspondent for the London Times, the most celebrated foreign journalist in America during the first year of the war, and offered his readers memorable descriptions of the First Battle of Bull Run as well as of such notables as George B. McClellan, Mary Todd Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, and William Seward.

$40.00











Muller, John. FREDERICK DOUGLASS IN WASHINGTON, DC: The Lion of Anacostia. . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2012). 6x9, over 40 images, 192 pages.
~~~ The remarkable journey of Frederick Douglass from fugitive slave to famed orator and author is well recorded. Yet little has been written about Douglass’s final years in Washington, D.C. Journalist John Muller explores how Douglass spent the last eighteen years of his life professionally and personally in his home, Cedar Hill, in Anacostia. The ever-active Douglass was involved in local politics, from aiding in the early formation of Howard University to editing a groundbreaking newspaper to serving as marshal of the District. During this time, his wife of forty-four years, Anna Murray, passed away, and eighteen months later, he married Helen Pitts, a white woman. Unapologetic for his controversial marriage, Douglass continued his unabashed advocacy for the rights of African Americans and women and his belief in American exceptionalism. Through meticulous research, Muller has created a fresh and intimate portrait of Frederick Douglass.



$20.00






Ellison, Mary, SUPPORT FOR SECESSION: Lancashire and the American Civil War. NF/NF. Jacket in mylar. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1972). Extensive page-end notes, appendices, bibliography, 259 pages.
~~~ For over a hundred years a myth persisted that during the American civil War the British working class and particularly the Lancashire cotton workers, though starved by the Union blockade of Confederate ports, stubbornly and nobly supported the North. In Support for Secession Mary Ellison destroys this myth. ~~~ Dr. Ellison demonstrates, mainly from a study of the local press, that Lancashire opinion was generally pro-Southern, motivated by a mixture of moral conviction and economic self-interest. There was in fact a supreme determination to aid the South with at least moral backing while the North was viewed with a mistrust that deepened with the intensity of the economic problem. This study investigates how and why this happened and what role social, economic, political and religious factors played in influencing reaction to the war. ~~~ A fairly clear pattern emerges from Dr Ellison's research: support for the South varied directly with the degree of economic distress, being highest where unemployment among textile workers was greatest. The most deeply affected Lancashire towns sent the most frequent and adamant petitions to Parliament and held huge open meetings pleading for British recognition of a separate South. Nor was the Emancipation Proclamation embraced by the workers. In Dr Ellison's view, almost everyone then believed the proclamation to be a political and military maneuver. ~~~ Dr Ellison's myth-shattering research is complemented by Peter d'A. Jone's Epilogue, "The History of a Myth: British Workers and the American Civil War." In it, Mr Jones considers the origins of these historical illusions that have been held so widely. Propagated by such men as John Bright, Henry Adams, Karl Marx, and Prime Minister Gladstone, the myth endured largely because it told people on both sides of the Atlantic what they wanted to hear.
~~ OUT OF PRINT.

$35.00




Fahs, Alice, IMAGINED CIVIL WAR: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (University of North Carolina Press, 2000). 424 pages.
~~~ In this groundbreaking work of cultural history, Alice Fahs explores a little-known and fascinating side of the Civil War--the outpouring of popular literature inspired by the conflict. From 1861 to 1865, authors and publishers in both the North and the South produced a remarkable variety of war-related compositions, including poems, songs, children's stories, romances, novels, histories, and even humorous pieces. Fahs mines these rich but long-neglected resources to recover the diversity of the war's political and social meanings. ~~~ Instead of narrowly portraying the Civil War as a clash between two great, white armies, popular literature offered a wide range of representations of the conflict and helped shape new modes of imagining the relationships of diverse individuals to the nation. Works that explored the war's devastating impact on white women's lives, for example, proclaimed the importance of their experiences on the home front, while popular writings that celebrated black manhood and heroism in the wake of emancipation helped readers begin to envision new roles for blacks in American life. ~~~ Recovering a lost world of popular literature, The Imagined Civil War adds immeasurably to our understanding of American life and letters at a pivotal point in our history.
~~~ Currently in print at $39.95.

$35.00




Garrison, Webb, MUTINY IN THE CIVIL WAR. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Shippensburg, PA: White Mane, 2001). First Edition. Intertextual illustrations throughout, bibliography, index, 310 pages.
~~~ Far from being merely a struggle for home and hearth, preservation of the Union, eventual emancipation of slaves, and other noble ideas, the Civil War was nitty-gritty throughout. Mutiny in the Civil War is the first ever volume on the subject, and deals with almost two hundred incidents. This study of resistance to authority illuminates the extent to which thousands of ordinary fighting men and many officers were opposed to policies and orders. Even more than the obvious matter of desertion, mutinies reveal how unpopular the war effort, as waged, had become with the men on the firing line. Aimed at general readers, Mutiny in the Civil War will also add material that will be new to specialists. These incidents range from one man to several regiments. Men of different ranks, nationalities, and races are all included in this one-of-a-kind study.

$29.95




Geier, Clarence R, Jr. and Susan E. Winter, LOOK THE THE EARTH: Historical Archaeology and the American Civil War. NEW copy, Hardcover with dust jacket. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1994). Photographs,tables, maps, notes, bibliography, index, 325 pages.
~~~ Table of Contents:
Foreword / Acknowledgments /PART ONE: Introduction and Directions / 1 Archaeological Perspectives on the Civil War: The Challenge to Achieve Relevance / The Archaeology of Trauma: An Introduction to the Historical Archaeology of the American Civil War / PART TWO: Battlefield Analysis and Reconstruction / When the Shooting Stopped, the War Began / Excavation Data for Civil War Era Military Sites in Middle Tennessee / Endangered Legacy: Virginia's Civil War Naval Heritage / PART THREE: Fortifications, Encampments, and Camp Life / Civil War Fortifications and Campgrounds on Maryland Heights, the Citadel of Harpers Ferry \ Civil War Material Culture and Camp Life in Central Kentucky: Archaeological Investigations at Camp Nelson / Cheat Summit Fort and Camp Allegheny: Early Civil War Encampments in West Virginia / PART FOUR: Other Directions / Corn-Belt Agriculture during the Civil War Period, 1850-70: A Research Prospectus for Historical Archaeology / Toward a Social History of the Civil War: The Hatcher-Cheatham Site / The Role of Espionage and Foreign Intelligence in the Development of Heavy Ordnance at the West Point Foundry Cold Spring, New York / Memorializing Landscapes and the Civil war in Harpers Ferry
OUT OF PRINT.

$40.00




Gingrich, Newt and William R. Forstchen, GRANT COMES EAST. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (St Martin's Press, 2004). 400 pages.
~~~ From Kirkus Reviews: "The Gingrich and Forstchen (military historian) 'what-if' take on the Civil War gathers some steam. After Lee's glittering Gettysburg triumph (ending volume one of what bids fair to be at least a trilogy) the tactical question becomes -- what next? Strike at the now vulnerable enemy capital? The decimated Army of the Potomac appears unable to protect Washington, and if Lee can occupy the city-as President Jefferson Davis is certain he can-perhaps the nightmarish struggle will be at last resolved. Failing that longed-for consummation, France and/or England might be willing to regard the Confederacy as legitimate and worthy of an alliance. But Lee's vaunted Army of Northern Virginia isn't what it once was. Victories have been costly. Manpower shortages are everywhere and critical. And, in the west, there's this new player, a worrisome Union general named Ulysses S. Grant, fresh from his own monster victory at Vicksburg. Urged on by the overconfident Davis, Lee attempts to storm Washington, where he meets much stiffer resistance than predicted-mounted, among others, by the elegant and aristocratic Colonel Robert Shaw (Matthew Broderick in Glory) and his legendary fifty-fourth of Massachusetts. ('Lincoln saw the columns of veterans beginning to shake out into the battle line, the men professional-looking, moving sharply. . . and they were colored.') The bloody chess game continues. Bold gambits are countered by desperate defenses as the armies maneuver for position, and always, always, with horrific slaughter of young men. Lincoln throws his full support behind Grant. Unaccountably, Jeff Davis's support for Lee begins to waver. As this second installment ends, Grant seems headed for Richmond. Isthat where Gingrich-Forstchen's champion heavyweights will finally slug it out? Those iconic figures manage more human-speak than they did in Gettysburg (2003), and the battle scenes continue war-lovingly rendered. Civil War buffs will be entertained.

$24.95




[Glenn], edited by Bayly Ellen Marks and Mark Norton Schatz, BETWEEN NORTH AND SOUTH: A MARYLAND JOURNALIST VIEWS THE CIVIL WAR: The Narrative of William Wilkins Glenn, 1861-1869. VG/VG. Price-clipped dust jacket in mylar. (Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1976). Frontispiece, page-end notes, appendices, extensive descriptive listing of persons and places mentioned in the diary, Bibliographical Essay, index, 430 pages.
~~~ This is a Civil War diary of unusual historical and literary value, written by William Wilkins glenn, a prominent Baltimorean and journalist who bought the Baltimore Daily Exchange at the beginning of the Civil War expressly to influence public opinion toward a pro-Southern, anti-administration view of the conflict. Because of his editorials, Glenn was arrested and imprisoned in Fort McHenry. However, through the influence and presitge of his friends, he was soon released. ~~~ He then started a vigorous campaign for the cause of the South. His subversive activities centered largely around the smuggling of persons "underground" into the South. Important British visitors sought his help, and for this he was forced to flee to England in 1863. He returned to America the following year, and, since he would have been arrested in Baltimore, he spent the remainder of the war up North. ~~~ Glenn was a man of many talents and interests -- a student of the law, an accomplished writer, and a perceptive poet who combined a successful business career with social and artistic graces. Among his many well-known friends were Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. He was a member of what is best described as the conservative elite. As a planter and manufacturer, also a slave owner and employer of free labor, he was fascinated by politics, though bound by tradition to keep aloof from the political process. ~~~ Glenn's sympathies, and those of his circle, lay with the South; their economic prospects, with the North. Their essential conservatism, however, placed them in a position of neutrality. It was his intention to publish this journal during his lifetime, and portions of it were obviously polished with the expectation of getting it into print. Ill health, along with the personal nature of its content, may have caused him to delay. ~~~ This first publication of Glenn's journal reflects the thought of a highly literate man whose breadth of mind and power of observation leave us heir to a marvelously intimate story of men and eveents during a crucial period in America's past, rewarding us with a kaleidoscopic effect too often missing in histories.

$35.00




John, Evan, ATLANTIC IMPACT 1861: England vs. America in the Civil War. G.P. Putnam's Sons., 1952. VG/VG. Dust jacket in nice condition, slightly darkened on the spine. Jacket in mylar protector. First Edition. Decorated end papers. 17 pages of illustrations. index, 296 pages.
~~~ Everyone knows that British public opinion was partial to the Confederate cause during the Civil War, largely because the Union blockade had deprived the English textile mills of cotton -- and perhaps because of a certain innate sympathy for the Southern way of life. Later Confederate privateers and blockade runners were financed, built and fitted out in England, and there were many diplomatic duels and quarrels in the press and out, but never was the situation more tense than when hot-headed Capt Wilkes removed the two Confederate commissioners, Mason and Slidell, from the S.S. Trent off the Cuban coast on a calm November morning in 1861. ~~~ With consummate skill Evan John shows how this event affected Lincoln, Jefferson Dafis and the Prince Consort, Secretary Seward Judah P. Benjamin and cynical old Lord Palmerston, Lord Lyons and Julia Ward Howe and Harriet Beecher Stowe, Lord John Russell and his namesake W.H. Russell, the ace correspondent of the London Times in Washington. In the end reason prevailed (with the help, perhaps, of a broken Trans-Atlantic cable) and the disaster of another great war was averted. ~~~ The book brings to life one of the most crucial episodes in our history, and supplies a splendid and unconventional series of portraits of the leading figures in the drama.

$30.00




Jahns, Patricia, MATTHEW FONTAINE MAURY & JOSEPH HENRY: Scientists of the Civil War. VG/Poor. Large tears and pieces missing from jacket, which is in mylar. (NY: Hastings House, 1961). Bibliography, index, 308 pages.
~~~ Poor, crippled, scorned by the top Naval brass, Matthew Maury never gave up. Because of an accident, there was no place for him in the Navy -- so he made one. The Navy was forced to accept him, forever to its benefit.
~~~ Maury was the first oceanographer. He started a new field of science -- yet lived to see his discoveries ridiculed, the same discoveries which are the core of today's science of the seas. And all because, in the great crisis of the Civil War, he let his heart, alone, make a vital decision.
~~~ Joseph Henry, the orphan boy who couldn't learn to read, would never say, "I'm busy," to helpful inventors. He was not a success in a materialistic world. But if Henry had patented just one of his own great inventions, he would have been one of the richest men in America.
~~~ These men, intelligent as they were, refused to tolerate each other's methods. They fought publicly and privately in that brash Washington society that was so soon to collapse into civil war and rebellion. They fought during that war on opposite sides, each trying to help a certain cause as he saw it. Yet their lives were, and are forever, entwined -- by opposites, by contrariness.
~~~ Here, then, are two of the greatest American scientists, portrayed in fascinating juxtaposition. Two men, forgotten by a public that daily benefits from their efforts. Two unusual men, dedicated, daring -- with their families and friends -- in the colorful framework of a collapsing Union.

$30.00




Jimerson, Randall C., THE PRIVATE CIVIL WAR: Popular Thought during the Sectional Conflict. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Louisiana State University Press, 1988). 300 pages.
~~~ Historians have given much attention to the Civil War's prominent players--its generals, politicians, and other public leaders--but they have devoted less attention to the common soldiers and civilians--the "plain folk"--who actively participated in the conflict. In his study of popular thought during the Civil War era, Randall C. Jimerson offers a grass-roots perspective on the war by examining the thoughts and ideas of these ordinary men and women. The Private Civil War derives much of its power from the author's deft use of personal letters and diaries. These documents, remarkable in many instances for their depth of feeling and eloquence, provide rich, detailed information about sectional perceptions and ideology as well as many private reflections.
~~~ Hardcover out of print; 'textbook paperback' in print at $22.95.

$25.00




Kunstler, Mort and James I. Robertson, GODS AND GENERALS: The Paintings of Mort Kunstler. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Greenwich Workshop Press, 2002). Foreword by Ron Maxwell. 144 pages.
~~~ America's premier Civil War artist, Mort Kunstler, is joined by the nation's leading Civil War historian, Dr. James I. Robertson, Jr., in this extraordinary visual history of the Civil War's dramatic first two years. A companion history to the motion picture of the same name, Gods and Generals is based on the best-selling Jeff Shaara novel, and surveys a crucial period in the War Between the States through incomparable artwork and a matchless narrative. Gods and Generals chronicles the momentous events of 1861 through early 1863 by following the lives of four principal figures from the Civil War, Robert E. Lee, "Stonewall" Jackson, Winfield S. Hancock and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. On fields of fire and glory, like First and Second Manassas, the Seven Days Battles, Antietam and Chancellorsville, the epic American struggle of brother-against-brother unfolds in this exceptional work. ~~~ Among the Americans caught in the flame of battle, none were more remarkable than Lee, Jackson, Hancock and Chamberlain. Lee, known for the caliber of his character as much as the mettle of his military genius, saved the South from what appeared to be almost certain defeat in mid-1862, and molded his rag-tag troops into a fighting force that at times seemed invincible. "Stonewall" Jackson, meanwhile, rose from a mediocre professor at VMI to become Robert E. Lee's invaluable "right arm," but in mid-spring of 1863 his greatest success would be earned at a terrible price for the South. Facing Lee's army -- and often failing -- was the Army of the Potomac. Despite the discouragement of defeat, the army's common soldier remained determined to fight and was dedicated to victory -- led by officers like Winfield S. Hancock, a gifted West Pointer, and Colonel Joshua L. Chamberlain, a college professor-turned-soldier. ~~~ The glory and the tragedy of the American Civil War -- and the fascinating figures from its history -- are depicted in Gods and Generals with unique depth and emotion. The classic art of Mort Kunstler and the captivating narrative by James I. Robertson, Jr. capture this pivotal period in America's bloodiest war unlike any other work of art and history.

$27.50




Marten, James, THE CHILDREN'S CIVIL WAR. NEW copy, Hardcover with dust jacket. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998). Photographs, notes, bibliography, index, 365 pages.
~~~ Children--white and black, northern and southern ~~ endured a vast and varied range of experiences during the Civil War. Children celebrated victories and mourned defeats, tightened their belts and widened their responsibilities, took part in patriotic displays and suffered shortages and hardships, fled their homes to escape enemy invaders and snatched opportunities to run toward the promise of freedom. ~~~ Offering a fascinating look at how children were affected by our nation's greatest crisis, James Marten examines their toys and games, their literature and schoolbooks, the letters they exchanged with absent fathers and brothers, and the hardships they endured. He also explores children's politicization, their contributions to their homelands' war efforts, and the lessons they took away from the war. Drawing on the childhoods of such diverse Americans as Jane Addams, Booker T. Washington, and Theodore Roosevelt, and on sources that range from diaries and memoirs to children's "amateur newspapers," Marten examines the myriad ways in which the Civil War shaped the lives of a generation of American children.
~~~ "An original-minded, skillfully and suggestively presented history, haunting in its detailed unfolding of a war that put so many already vulnerable youngsters in danger, but elicited from some of them, as well, impressively sensitive, responsive thoughts, gestures, and deeds in what became, as this extraordinary book's title insists, their civil war." --Journal of American History
~~~ "James Marten's thoroughly researched and engagingly written study . . . stands as one of the most exciting studies to emerge in the last dozen years. . . . Marten has taken a topic ignored by both Civil War historians and historians of childhood and crafted an engaging, masterful, nuanced, and readable study that will not quickly leave the reader's mind or heart." --American Studies
~~~ "The first comprehensive account of Civil War children . . . Thoroughly researched and nicely illustrated, The Children's Civil War will be a touchstone for historians and generalists who seek to gain a fuller understanding of life on the home front between 1861 and 1865." --Civil War History

$35.00




Martinez, J. Michael, LIFE AND DEATH IN CIVIL WAR PRISONS. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Rutledge Hill Press). 268 pages.
~~~ More than anything, Civil War soldiers feared becoming a prisoner of war. Dysentery, starvation, harsh weather, and brutal mistreatment killed more men in prisons than were killed at Gettysburg. This book strips the war of its romance and pageantry. What is left is the horror of the war and the extraordinary courage of American soldiers from both North and South.

$24.95




Mrazek, Robert J., UNHOLY FIRE: A Novel of the Civil War. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Thomas Dunne Books). 299 pages.
~~~ John "Kit" McKittredge is a young Federal officer from Maine who is terribly wounded in one of the first battles of the Civil War. Still unfit for active duty after nine months in hospital, he is recruited by an unorthodox colonel named Valentine Burdette to work in the Provost Marshal General's office in Washington. The beleaguered Capital, now swollen to seven times its pre-war population, is filled with saloons, brothels, spies, thieves and murderers. It is also rife with official corruption and political intrigue. While investigating what appears to be a routine case of military procurement fraud, Kit becomes embroiled in the murder of a beautiful young woman who has had the misfortune to attend the birthday party of Union General Joseph Hooker, the notorious and charming libertine. The investigation leads Kit through a series of harrowing adventures - both on the battlefield and in the Capital's darkest dens of depravity - until he and Val Burdette must confront a vast criminal conspiracy that threatens both their own lives as well as the fate of the Republic.
~~~ Currently in print at $29.95.

$24.95




New York Times Staff, THE MOST FEARFUL ORDEAL: Original Coverage of the Civil War by Writers and Reporters of The New York Times. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (St Martin's Press, 2004). Introduction by James M. McPherson Illustrations, maps, 420 pages.
~~~ It Was a War That Shaped America more than any other in our history since the Revolutionary War, and its effects were perhaps even more far reaching. More lives were lost and more domestic property destroyed than in any other conflict in which this country has been involved. More, in fact, than in all other past struggles combined. Much has been written about the Civil War since its conclusion nearly a century and a half ago; those five bloody years have proven a seemingly inexhaustible source and inspiration for films, novels, documentaries, and works of history. We are drawn to the period, and return to it ceaselessly, for we have come to acknowledge the war as the crucible in which the nation's identity was forged by fire, defining what the country was and what it would become. Harpers Ferry, Fort Sumter, Bull Run, Antietam, Gettysburg, Appomattox, Ford's Theatre -- far more than names or places, these are epic moments in a drama of courage, sacrifice, and profound change. ~~~ But what was it like to have been there? To have watched John Brown hang and Pickett charge and Lee surrender and Abraham Lincoln assassinated? The Most Fearful Ordeal contains The New York Times's original coverage of these and other crucial events of the Civil War, offering today's reader history as it was first being transmitted, via the newly invented telegraph, by reporters and other eyewitnesses on the scene. Here are the accounts that people at the time would have read as these events were unfolding. Indeed, the coverage provided by The Times and other newspapers was their only connection to what was happening. Every word was pored over, every article read again and again. "The American flag has given place to the Palmetto of South Carolina" -- so begins, with ominous solemnity, the coverage of the bombardment of Fort Sumter in April 1861. As Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., declared that August, when his son and namesake, the future Supreme Court justice, prepared to depart for Virginia, "We must have something to eat and the papers to read." ~~~ Here are the legendary figures and events as they first appeared in print, giving readers history's first draft: urgent, alive, reporting the passions and tensions of the moment, raw and unpolished. Often the words and events that have endured the longest in our national memory (such as Lincoln's Gettysburg Address) received only brief note, and occasionally there are mistakes in initial assumptions (believing that the second battle of Bull Run was a major Union victory rather than a catastrophic defeat). With an introduction and notes by Pulitzer Prize -- winning Civil War historian James McPherson that put each major event and dispatch into historical context, The Most Fearful Ordeal is enhanced by period photographs and maps that explain the strategies behind the major battles. Most of all, it brings to life the fearful days, and makes the Civil War a vivid presence in this new century.

$35.00




Nicolay, John G., THE OUTBREAK OF REBELLION. NEW copy. (Harrisburg, PA: Archive Society, 1992). Facsimile reprint of original 1881-1883 Scribner's edition. Finely bound in blue leatherette, with stamped decorations, gilt inlays and gilt edges. Marbled endpages. Sewn binding. Maps, appendices, index, 226 pages. A beautiful, pristine little (4x6) book.
~~~ John G. Nicolay (1832–1901) was an undeniably apt and brilliant choice to inaugurate the landmark Campaigns of the Civil War series. Private secretary to President Lincoln and coauthor (with John Hay) of the monumental, ten-volume Lincoln biography, Nicolay experienced the Civil War from a unique vantage point: living in the White House, witnessing the many momentous events and minor wranglings, sharing the nation's trauma with Lincoln, and winning his open confidence. It is Nicolay's firsthand knowledge and personal observations of the key figures that imbue The Outbreak of Rebellion (1881) with immediacy and thrust. Here is the secession fever that swept the South; Lincoln's shrewd and desperate maneuverings to hold the border states; the behind-the-scenes debates about how to respond to the crisis; the attack on Fort Sumter and the call to arms; and the hard-fought battle along Bull Run creek that resulted in a chaotic Federal defeat and the first appalling casualties of the war. Nicolay's insider view of the opening act of the Civil War has produced a succinct, compelling account of considerable value and fascinating insights.
~~~ This edition OUT OF PRINT.

$65.00








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Stern, Philip van Doren, SECRET MISSIONS OF THE CIVIL WAR . (NY: Bonanza). VG- (light wear). Blue boards illlustrations. Reprint edition.
~~~ "This prominent Civil War historian has woven a compelling history of the Civil War from first- hand accounts by men and women who undertook secret missions and were involved in underground activities for both sides. Includes discussions of codes and ciphers used during the war."

$20.00




White, Christine Schultz & Benton R. White (Contributor), NOW THE WOLF HAS COME: The Creek Nation in the Civil War. Texas A&M, 1996. NEW copy, still in shrink-wrap. 193 pages.
~~~ Wolves stalk their prey deliberately, closing in from all sides and staking claim to the land and all its creatures. In the eyes of the Creek Nation, Confederate troops were wolves, stalking the People. In the winter of 1861-62, nine thousand Native Americans in Indian Territory took a chance. Drawing on little else but wits, raw courage, and unshakable faith in the old gods and their aging leader, Opothleyahola, they made a desperate escape from Confederate troops that were closing in. Recounted here from a unique Creek/Muskogee perspective, their dramatic journey seeking Federal protection in Kansas was filled with hazards; their destination, with disillusion and despair. On the trek the fleeing tribes suffered from blizzards, disease, and starvation. The numbers of those who survived natural depredations were further whittled away by constant harassment and desperate pitched battles with rival bands of the Creek Nation led by the Confederate-allied McIntosh family, adjoining Cherokees under Colonel Stand Watie, and Texan Confederate sympathizers. When the band finally straggled into Kansas, two thousand had died or were missing. Even then, their trials were not over: Federal "protection" proved to be hollow and harsh. Along with many others, Old Opothleyahola himself died in one of the bleak Federal camps. Told from the Native American view of the events, never before written, this narrative account relies heavily on Creek oral tradition. Personal interviews with members of the Muskogee Nation have been supplemented with academic research in state, federal, and university archives and in the records of the Museum of the Muskogee Nation in Okmulgee, Oklahoma. Not only students of Native American history but also those interested in the Civil War will find this volume invaluable reading.

$30.00











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Whitman, Walt (ed by Peter Coviello), MEMORANDA DURING THE WAR. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (NY: Oxford University Press, 2004). Photographs, notes, editor's notes, appendices, index, 176 pages.
~~~ In December of 1862, having read his brother's name in a casualty list, Walt Whitman rushed from Brooklyn to the war front, where he found his brother wounded but recovering. But Whitman also found there a "new world," a world dense with horror and revelation." Memoranda During the War is Whitman's testament to the anguish, heroism, and terror of the Civil War. The book consists of journal entries extending from Whitman's arrival on the front in 1862 through to the war's conclusion in 1865. Whitman details his encounters with soldiers and doctors, meditates on particular battles and on the meanings of the war for the nation, and recounts his wordless though peculiarly intimate public exchanges with President Lincoln, a man Whitman saw often on the streets of Washington and by whom he was deeply fascinated. The book offers an astounding amalgam of death portraits, anecdotes of battle, last words, messages to distant loved ones, and remarkably restrained and muted descriptions of pain, dismemberment, and dying - all of it, however grim, suffused with Whitman's undiminished enthusiasm and affection for these young soldiers. And throughout, we find Whitman laboring with heroic determination to sustain and nourish his once-ardent faith in America and American life, even as the nation unleashed unprecedented violence upon itself. The book also includes Whitman's famous speech "The Death of Abraham Lincoln," selected poems, and a letter to the parents of a deceased soldier.

$25.00




[Whitman] Walter Lowenfels (ed), WALT WHITMAN'S CIVIL WAR. VG, trade PAPERBACK. Minor scuffs; still a tight, clean copy. (De Capo Press, 1989). Reprint edition of original 1961 edition. Illustrated by Winslow Homer. Sources, bibliography, notes, appendix. 333 pages.
~~~ From a mosiac of materials: newspaper dispatches, letters, notebooks, published and unpublished works-as well as thirty-six of Whitman's great war poems, Lowenfels has created a unique document on the Civil War.
~~~ "For years I have been saying that John Brown's Body was the best single volume on the Civil War. But I've got to revise my opinion and subplant it by Walt Whitman's Civil War. It is beautifully done." ~~~ Samuel Eliot Morison.
~~~ Currently in print at $18.

$15.00




[Whitman] John Harmon McElroy (ed), THE SACRIFICIAL YEARS: A Chronicle of Walt Whitman's Experiences in the Civil War. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Boston: David R. Godine, 1999). First Edition. Photographs, index, 200 pages.
~~~ From Kirkus Reviews: The sight of defeated soldiers returning from battle is one America hasn't seen on its own turf since the Civil War. It's a sight that was vividly recorded by Walt Whitman, whose letters, newspaper articles, and other writings from the war are collected here chronologically for the first time. His descriptions are immediate and chilling. Here are soldiers in the wake of the first battle of Bull Run: "During the forenoon Washington gets all over motley with these defeated soldiers—queer-looking objects, strange eyes and faces, drench'd (the steady rain drizzles on all day) and fearfully worn, hungry, haggard, blister'd in the feet." So compelled was he by the sight of wounded and dying soldiers that he volunteered as a nurse to attempt to relieve their suffering. Editor McElroy, professor emeritus of American literature at the University of Arizona, gathers here Whitman's dispatches from his years of service, 1861–66. The great poet's admiration for those who have seen battle will resound today, when we are re-learning respect for the silent heroism of American GIs: "There is something majestic about a man who has borne his part in battles, especially if he is very quiet regarding it when you desire him to unbosom. I am continually lost at the absence of blowing and blowers among the old-young American militaires." (16 pages b&w illustrations)
~~~ Originally published at $29,95, now OUT OF PRINT.

$35.00




[Whitman] Roy Morris, BETTER ANGEL: Walt Whitman in the Civil War. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. Oxford University Press, 2000. 270 pages.
~~~ From Publishers Weekly: Before the war, Whitman was, the author argues, depressed and adrift in New York's bohemia; suffering from writer's block regarding his poetry, he occupied himself with journalistic hackwork. But when his brother was wounded at Fredericksburg, Whitman found a cause that revived his sense of purpose: he spent three years visiting tens of thousands of wounded soldiers in and around Washington, D.C. -- and by the end of the war, he had become 'the good gray poet,' a larger-than-life figure Morris calls 'almost mystical.' The war, as Whitman himself acknowledged, 'saved' him. His wartime experience inspired some of his best work, including the masterpiece 'When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd.' The postwar years also engendered a deep despair, however. Fearful that the nation had forgotten its soldiers in the heady days of the Gilded Age, the poet attacked 'the post -war climate of graft and malaise.' However despondent, Whitman produced important writing after the dust had cleared. The Better Angel enriches our understanding of his subsequent life and work.
~~~
~~~ Originally in print at $25, now OUT OF PRINT.

$30.00






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