Twentieth Century

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Twentieth Century

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Norris, Frank, NOVELS AND ESSAYS: Vandover & the Brute; McTeague; The Octopus; Essays. NEW copy, Hardcover with dust jacket. (Library of America, 1986), 1232 pages.
~~~ Three novels and the collected literary essays of America's most promising naturalist writer. Norris's grim and vivid studies of decadent urban society and crude rural life in northern California combine his interests in the emerging sciences of psychology and economics with a taste for exciting action and disturbing drama. Contains Vandover and the Brute, McTeague, and The Octopus, along with essays addressing literary theory, American fiction, and the social responsibilities of the artist.

$40.00













[O'Connor] Marion Montgomery. HILLBILLY THOMIST: Flannery O’Connor, St. Thomas and the Limits of Art . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2006). 7x10, in two volumes. Appendices, notes, bibliography, index, 706 pages.

~~~ Eudora Welty and Walker Percy were friends but very different writers, even though both were from the Deep South and intensely interested in the relation of place to their fiction. This work explores in each the concept of home and the importance of home to the homo viator ("man on his way"), and anti-idealism and anti-romanticism.
~~~ The differences between Welty and Percy and in their fiction were revealed in the habits of their lives. Welty spent her life in Jackson, Mississippi, and was very much a member of the community. Percy was a wanderer who finally settled in Covington, Louisiana, because it was, as he called it, a "noplace." The author also asserts that Percy somewhat envied Welty and her stability in Jackson, and that for him, place was such a nagging concern that it became a personal problem to him as homo viator.

$95.00








Omanson, BJ. STARK COUNTY POEMS: War and the Depression come to Spoon River. New copy, trade paperback. (Monongahela Press, 2017). First edition. Map, line drawings, photograph, 71 pages.

The poems in this collection, drawn from Omanson's rural midwestern heritage and shaped by the regionalist/naturalistic tradition of American poetry, were written over a period of some thirty-five years. They first appeared in such literary journals as Shenandoah, The Hudson Review, The Sewanee Review and the Academy of American Poets anthology series, New Voices.

Born four days after the death of Edgar Lee Masters, BJ Omanson was raised in the Spoon River valley of Stark County, Illinois, where his father, both grandfathers and several great-grandfathers had farmed since the mid-nineteenth century, and where members of his family still farm today.




Nowhere to Nowhere

When they sold off the farm she took the child
and caught a bus out of town— as for him,
with everyone gone and everything grim,
he opened a pint of bourbon, piled

pictures, letters and clothes in the yard,
doused them in kerosene, struck a match
and watched as they burnt to ashes, watched
and worked on his whiskey, working hard.

The next morning he caught an outbound freight
heading god-knows-where and he didn’t care—
he was down to nothing, a gypsy’s fare—
down to a rusty tin cup and a plate,

dice and a bible, a bedroll and fate,
down to a bone-jarring ride on a train
through country dying and desperate for rain,
running nowhere to nowhere and running late.






















[O'Neill] Thierry Dubost. STRUGGLE, DEFEAT OR REBIRTH: Eugene O’Neill’s Vision of Humanity . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2005 [1997]). 6x9. Translated by Rosalind Dilys and Christine McGarry. References, bibliography, index, 293 pages.

~~~ To Eugene O’Neill, the links between man and his surroundings were of prime importance. His characters struggled with existential problems, and how they related to them reveals much about O’Neill’s own humanity. For the most part, the characters defeat their problems and in doing so are "reborn" in some manner.
~~~ This work examines the 49 plays that O’Neill completed, focusing on his attempt to find an inner truth in his characters. Part One explores the family, showing how a person is trapped by heredity, space, time and communal hierarchy. Part Two deals with the individual and society, showing how societal conventions confined the characters. In Part Three, personal freedom is the centerpiece, showing how the characters develop a specific approach to life that leads to a coherent vision of the characters’ relationships with the world around them.

$39.95





[O'Neill] Eileen J. Herrmann & Robert M. Dowling (eds). EUGENE O'NEILL AND HIS EARLY CONTEMPORARIES: Bohemians, Radicals, Progressives and the Avant Garde . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011). 6x9. 30 photos, appendix, notes, bibliography, index, 324 pages.

~~~ Eugene O’Neill was one of the great American playwrights of the twentieth century. Spanning the years 1910-1930, the 14 essays in this volume address the milieu he knew best--his friends in bohemian Greenwich Village, Provincetown, on waterfronts around the globe, and in the other beloved communities that comprised his early circle. At a time when O’Neill’s creative powers were in their infancy, these influences formed the backdrop of his creative development and, consequently, demand more intensive study than they have received to date. This collection also highlights the larger modernist period and its impact on the First World War, the Little Theater Movement, the Abbey Players of Dublin, philosophical anarchism, and other contemporary upheavals that permeate his drama. Interspersed with rare period photos and illustrations, this volume contextualizes O’Neill’s plays in the tumult of his historical and cultural moment, offering scholars a fresh approach to his life and art.

$45.00





[O'Neill] Egil Tornqvist. EUGENE O'NEILL: A Playwright's Theatre . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2004). 6x9. Appendices, notes, bibliography, index, 268 pages.

~~~ Eugene O’Neill wrote his plays for a theatre in which the playwright would take a central position. He presented himself as a controlling personality both in the texts--in the form of ample stage directions--and in performances based on these texts. His plays address several audiences--reader, spectator, and production team--and scripts were often different from the published versions. This study examines O’Neill’s multiple roles as a writer for many audiences.
~~~ After a description of O’Neill’s working conditions and the multiple audiences of the plays, this study examines the various formal aspects of the plays: titles, settings in time and place, names and addresses, language, and connections and allusions to other works. An examination of the plays follows, with particular emphasis on Bound East for Cardiff, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, and A Touch of the Poet.

$39.95














[Welty, Percy] Marion Montgomery. EUDORA WELTY AND WALKER PERCY: The Concept of Home in Their Lives and Literature . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2004). 6x9. Notes, index, 220 pages.

~~~ Eudora Welty and Walker Percy were friends but very different writers, even though both were from the Deep South and intensely interested in the relation of place to their fiction. This work explores in each the concept of home and the importance of home to the homo viator ("man on his way"), and anti-idealism and anti-romanticism.
~~~ The differences between Welty and Percy and in their fiction were revealed in the habits of their lives. Welty spent her life in Jackson, Mississippi, and was very much a member of the community. Percy was a wanderer who finally settled in Covington, Louisiana, because it was, as he called it, a "noplace." The author also asserts that Percy somewhat envied Welty and her stability in Jackson, and that for him, place was such a nagging concern that it became a personal problem to him as homo viator.

$39.95















[Robinson] Robert L. Gate. AN EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON ENCYCLOPEDIA . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2012 [2006]). 7x10. Appendix, chronology, bibliography, index, 279 pages.

~~~ Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869-1935) was hailed by many in his day as America’s foremost poet, outranking T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, and Ezra Pound. Perhaps best known for his sonnets, he startles readers into attention and response through obscurity and ambiguity and demanding syntax. Many of Robinson’s works continue to be published today, introducing him to new generations of readers.
~~~ This comprehensive encyclopedia provides information on Robinson’s poems--he published more than 200--and also his less well-known prose works, along with entries on his family, friends, and professional associates.
~~~ Entries on his writings give the year published, a summary, background information, and critical commentary illuminating enigmatic passages

$55.00












Sandburg, Carl, THE PEOPLE, YES. VG, PAPERBACK. (Harvest Books, 1990). 300 pages.
~~~ A long poem that makes brilliant use of the legends and myths, the tall tales and sayings of America. "If America has a folksinger today he is Carl Sandburg, a singer who comes out of the prairie soil... who can hand back to the people a creation that has scraps of their own insight, humor, and imagination" (Padraic Colum).
~~~ Currently in print at $17.

$15.00








Poet


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[Sinclair] Ruth Clifford Engs (ed). UNSEEN UPTON SINCLAIR: Nine Unpublished Stories, Essays and Other Works . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2019). 6x9. 3 photos, notes, bibliography, index, 187 pages.

~~~ Best known for his muckraking expose of the squalor and brutality that pervaded the livestock industry in his book The Jungle, Upton Sinclair’s political activism was not limited to issues of workers’ rights or workplace safety. These nine short works, never before published, reveal an author who also wrestled with questions concerning women’s independence and the state of the health care industry in America. Always controversial, Sinclair ranges here from the comic to the deadly serious, while investigating issues that include artificial insemination and dietary measures. A substantial biographical introduction gives new insights into Sinclair’s concerns.

$35.00










Novelist &
Playwright


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Steinbeck, John, THE GRAPES OF WRATH. NEW copy, trade paperback. Penguin Books (Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century), 455 pages.

~~~ "One of the greatest and most socially significant novels of the twentieth century, Steinbeck's controversial masterpiece indelibly captured America during the Great Depression through the story of one Oklahoma farm family, the Joads. Intensely human yet majestic in its scale and moral vision, tragic but ultimately stirring in its insistence on human dignity, The Grapes of Wrath (1939) is not only a landmark American novel, but it is as well an extraordinary moment in the history of our nation's conscience."

$15.00



Steinbeck, John, THE GRAPES OF WRATH. NEW copy, TRADE PAPERBACK. Penguin Books (Steinbeck Centennial Edition), 455 pages.
~~~ "John Steinbeck's Pulitzer Prize-winning epic of the Great Depression follows the western movement of one family and a nation in search of work and human dignity."

$15.00






Artist & Author
of Short Stories


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[Welty, Percy] Marion Montgomery. EUDORA WELTY AND WALKER PERCY: The Concept of Home in Their Lives and Literature . NEW copy, trade paperback. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2004). 6x9. Notes, index, 220 pages.

~~~ Eudora Welty and Walker Percy were friends but very different writers, even though both were from the Deep South and intensely interested in the relation of place to their fiction. This work explores in each the concept of home and the importance of home to the homo viator ("man on his way"), and anti-idealism and anti-romanticism.
~~~ The differences between Welty and Percy and in their fiction were revealed in the habits of their lives. Welty spent her life in Jackson, Mississippi, and was very much a member of the community. Percy was a wanderer who finally settled in Covington, Louisiana, because it was, as he called it, a "noplace." The author also asserts that Percy somewhat envied Welty and her stability in Jackson, and that for him, place was such a nagging concern that it became a personal problem to him as homo viator.

$39.95



















Poet


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Colonial Period

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Twentieth Century

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