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click to enlarge Burke, E.M. & T.J. O'Gorman. END OF WATCH: Chicago Police Killed in the Line of Duty, 1853-2006. NF, trade paperback, 8.5x11. (Chicago's Books Press, 2006). Illustrations. 566 pp.
~~~ Examines the remarkable sacrifice of 534 sworn officers of the Chicago Police Department. A detailed narrative of each officer and the circumstances involved in their deaths trace the heroic history of Chicago's finest. Well illustrated.This work traces the emergence of the police officer as hero and the police novel as a significant popular genre, from the cameo appearances of police in detective novels of the 1930s and 1940s through the serial killer and forensic novels of the 1990s. It follows the ways in which professional writers and police officers turned writers view the police individually and collectively. The work chronicles the ways in which changes in the law and society have affected the actions of the police and shows how the protagonists of police novels have changed in gender, race, nationality, sexual orientation, and age over the years. The major writers examined begin with Julian Hawthorne in the nineteenth century, and include such writers as S.S. van Dine, Ellery Queen, Erle Stanley Gardner, Ed McBain, Chester Himes, MacKinley Kantor, Hillary Waugh, Dorothy Uhnak, Joseph Wambaugh, Bob Leuci, W.E.B. Griffin, and Carol O’Connor.

$35.00


click to enlarge DeSario, Frankie BADGE #1: True Stories from a Boston Cop. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2007). 6x9. Over 35 images. 128 pages.
~~ Frankie DeSario offers here a vivid account of his forty-year career with the Boston Police Department. With stories of mafia and gangland slayings, busing, race riots, thugs and corruption, Frankie reveals what it was like to have a ringside seat at events that made history. Engrossing and revealing from the first page to the last, here is a real-world look at life on the beat and behind the badge.

$20.00


Lott, Ray, POLICE ON SCREEN: Hollywood Cops, Detectives, Marshals and Rangers. NEW copy, trade paperback, 7x10. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. Publishers, 2006). 71 photos, filmography, notes, bibliographies, index, 222 pp.
~~~ From the Roman Praetorian Guard to the English shire-reeve to the U.S. marshals, lawmen have a long and varied history. At first, such groups were often corrupt, guilty of advancing a political agenda rather than protecting citizens. It was about the turn of the twentieth century that police officers as we know them came into being. At this time, a number of police reforms such as civil service and police unions were developed. Citizen committees were formed to oversee police function. About this same time, the technology of motion pictures was being advanced. Movies evolved from silent films with a limited budget and short running time to films with sound whose budget was ever rising and whose audience demanded longer, more complex story lines. From the infancy of moviemaking, lawmen of various types were popular subjects. Bounty hunters, sheriffs, private eyes, detectives and street officers--often portrayed by some of Hollywood’s biggest names--have been depicted in every conceivable way.
~~~ Compiled from a comprehensive examination of the material in question, this volume provides a critical-historical analysis of law enforcement in American cinema. From High Noon to The Empire Strikes Back, it examines the police in their many incarnations with emphasis on the ways in which lawmen are portrayed and how this portrayal changes over time. Each film discussed reveals something about society, subtly commenting on social conditions, racial issues and government interventions. Major historical events such as the Great Depression, World War II and the McCarthy trials find their way into many of these films. Significant film genres from science fiction to spaghetti western are represented. Films examined include Easy Street (1917), a nominal comedy starring Charlie Chaplin; Star Packer, a 1934 John Wayne film; The Maltese Falcon (1941) with Humphrey Bogart; Dirty Harry, a 1971 Clint Eastwood classic; Leslie Nielsen’s spoof Naked Gun (1988); and 1993’s Tombstone featuring Kurt Russell. The filmography contains a synopsis along with information on director, screenplay, starring actors and year of production. Photographs and an index are also included. This examination of the role of alcohol in hard-boiled detective fiction begins with the genre’s birth, in an era strongly influenced and affected by Prohibition, and follows both the genre’s development and its relation to our changing understanding of and attitudes towards alcohol and alcoholism. It discusses the works of Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Mickey Spillane, Robert B. Parker, Lawrence Block, Marcia Muller, Karen Kijewski and Sue Grafton. There are bibliographies of both the primary and critical texts, and an index of authors and works.

$39.95

click to enlarge O'Rourke, John E. JERSEY TROOPERS: Sacrifice at the Altar of Public Service. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2007). 6x9. Over 60 images. 162 pages.
~~ Frankie DeSario offers here a vivid account of his forty-year career with the Boston Police Department. With stories of mafia and gangland slayings, busing, race riots, thugs and corruption, Frankie reveals what it was like to have a ringside seat at events that made history. Engrossing and revealing from the first page to the last, here is a real-world look at life on the beat and behind the badge.

$20.00


Panek, Leroy Lad. THE AMERICAN POLICE NOVEL: A History. NEW copy, trade paperback, 6x9. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. Publishers, 2003). Photos, bibliography, index, 303 pp.
~~~ The American police novel emerged soon after World War II and by the end of the century it was one of the most important forms of American crime fiction. The vogue for either Holmesian genius or the plucky amateur detective dominated mystery fiction until mid-century; the police hero offered a way to make the traditional mystery story contemporary. The police novel reflects sociology and history, and addresses issues tied to the police force, such as corruption, management, and brutality. Since the police novel reflects current events, the changing natures of crime, court procedures, and legislation have an impact on its plots and messages. An examination of the police novel covers both the evolution of a genre of fiction and American culture in general.
~~~ This work traces the emergence of the police officer as hero and the police novel as a significant popular genre, from the cameo appearances of police in detective novels of the 1930s and 1940s through the serial killer and forensic novels of the 1990s. It follows the ways in which professional writers and police officers turned writers view the police individually and collectively. The work chronicles the ways in which changes in the law and society have affected the actions of the police and shows how the protagonists of police novels have changed in gender, race, nationality, sexual orientation, and age over the years. The major writers examined begin with Julian Hawthorne in the nineteenth century, and include such writers as S.S. van Dine, Ellery Queen, Erle Stanley Gardner, Ed McBain, Chester Himes, MacKinley Kantor, Hillary Waugh, Dorothy Uhnak, Joseph Wambaugh, Bob Leuci, W.E.B. Griffin, and Carol O’Connor.

$39.95


click to enlarge Sharpe, Reginald E. TRUE STORIES FROM A LOWCOUNTRY COP: Tales from the Charleston County Beat. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Charleston: The History Press, 2008). 6x9. Over 60 images. 128 pages.
~~ Charleston County Sheriff's Deputy Reggie Sharpe presents his experiences from fifteen years behind the badge, and holds forth on life, death, sex, drugs and humor in a straightforward, additively readable style.

$18.00



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