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Baker, C. Alice, TRUE STORIES OF NEW ENGLAND CAPTIVES CARRIED TO CANADA DURING THE OLD FRENCH AND INDIAN WARS. . Volume I. . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Heritage Books, 2004. Illustrations, index, 420 pages. "Recounts in detail the Indian attacks at Wells and York, Maine, Dover, New Hampshire, and Hatfield, Haverhill, and Deerfield, Massachusetts. Focuses on a few of the participants with extensive genealogical and biographical data. The families treated are: Baker, Nims, Otis, Plaisted, Rishworth, Rising, Sayward, Sheldon, Silver, Stockwell, Stebbins, Wheelwright, and Williams. The captives discussed in detail here are only treated briefly in the companion volume by Coleman. (1896)."

$34.00





Bearor, Bob, FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR BATTLESITES: A Controversy. . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Heritage Books, 2005. Illustrations, photos of artifacts, maps, bibliography, index, 140 pages.
~~~ "Searching through his beloved Adirondack woods wearing 18th-century clothing and equipment, best-selling Heritage Books author Bob Bearor discovered what is believed to be the long-lost sites of Rogers’ Rangers’ winter battle of January, 1757, and the ambush and death of Lord Howe in the summer of 1758. By comparing accounts in both French and British journals, military records and other sources, Bearor carefully retraced the routes of the advancing troops and reconstructed actual times and distances, thus verifying the sites. Archeological evidence subsequently confirmed his findings. The controversy arises because other writers have placed the battles at different locations, but no one has ever trekked these historic trails in person to test their theories — Until now. First, the battles are recounted in picturesque detail, in a way that can only be done by someone familiar with the region and its history. Then comes an explanation of the methods used in the discovery, exploration and verification of the sites. The coup de grace is a description of the treasure trove of artifacts found at the site. This work includes photographs of artifacts, maps and illustrations, a bibliography and a fullname-plus-subject index."

$17.50




Bittner, Rosanne, INTO THE WILDERNESS. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Forge-), 240 pages.
~~~ Set in 1750s Pennsylvania, Into the Wilderness depicts life in the Allegheny Mountains and the Northeast at the beginning of the French and Indian War. Noah Wilde is a "long hunter," a man who hunts game for settlements and forts and is sometimes gone for months at a time. Sixteen-year-old Jessica Matthews is attacked by Ottawa Indians and is saved by Noah, who is wounded in the encounter. As Noah recovers at Jessica's mountain cabin, he and Jessica fall in love, but Noah, who is secretly spying for the English government, has a mission to fulfill and is forced to leave once he recovers.

$23.95




Borneman, Walter R., THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR: Deciding the Fate of North America. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. 384 pages.
~~~ From 1754 to 1763, American colonists and British regulars fought French regulars, Canadian colonists, and Indians in a war that ranged from the frontier to the gates of Quebec and Nova Scotia. After two years the British formally declared war on France and began what became known as the Seven Years War as other European powers became involved with battles across the globe from islands in the Caribbean through Europe and the Mediterranean to Africa, India, and the Philippines. Walter R. Borneman covers both the American phase as well as the larger war and he concludes by showing how the war laid the foundation for the American Revolution. Throughout his narrative, he personalizes, in deft strokes, the leading actors and some of the subordinate players such as George Washington.
~~~ Although French explorers and traders ventured over much more of the continent, relatively few colonists settled in the great expanse they claimed. In contrast, the British colonists who far outnumbered the French settlers were located in the strip between the Atlantic and the Appalachian. There had been friction as the several wars between the two powers in Europe spilled over into the New World but the French and Indian War began on the frontier.
~~~ In late 1753, when French forces pushed farther south of the Great Lakes and established small forts, the colonial governor of Virginia dispatched a 21-year old militia officer, George Washington, to warn them off. This proved ineffectual and other colonies and the government in London began to be concerned. The British government hoped that sending a veteran officer, Edward Braddock, with two regiments in 1755 and giving him authority over the colonial troops would settle the problem. A smaller force of French regulars, Canadian militia, and Indians, however, routed his expedition in a battle which cost Braddock his life.
~~~ Three more British commanders also failed before Jeffrey Amherst took command three years later. Under his leadership the tide turned as British and American troops began to drive the French out of forts below the Great Lakes. In 1759, the mercurial James Wolfe took the war to Canada and defeated the French at Quebec. A year later the French surrendered all of Canada. In the larger war, British Navy dominated the sea war while British troops conquered Cuba, Guadeloupe and Martinique in the West Indies and Manila in the Philippines.
~~~ The peace settlement in 1763 between the great powers did not settle the American frontier. Within a few months several Indian tribes rose up against the British who defeated them but trouble with the colonists was just beginning as British measures laid the foundation for the American Revolution. In that war, veterans of this earlier war, such as British generals, Thomas Gage and William Howe, and American generals, Washington, Horatio Gates, and Benedict Arnold, played greater roles. ~~~Edward M. Coffman

$27.95








Wahil, Andrew J., BRADDOCK ROAD CHRONICLES, 1755: From the Diaries and Records of Members of the Braddock Expedition and Others Arranged in a Day by Day Chronology . NEW copy, trade paperback. Heritage Books, 1999. Illustrations, maps, 489 pages.

~~~ In 1755 Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock was put in charge of constructing a road from the Potomac River at Wills Creek (Cumberland, MD), to Fort Duquesne (present-day Pittsburgh) at the forks of the Ohio River. His object was to take the fort and thereby launch the conquest of French-held North America. Although Braddock was killed not far from his goal in the grisly clash known today as Braddock's Defeat, the route that he opened ultimately became a highway for western emigration, and part of it was incorporated in the National Road. The making of the Braddock Road was an engineering marvel that tested the abilities and endurance of its builders. The remarkable detail contained in this compilation is too vast to mention here but includes descriptions of forts, personnel, food, Indians, clothing, lodging and more. Carpenters, artificers, shoemakers, tailors, wagonmasters, farriers, nurses, cooks: nothing less than a traveling city was required in the construction of the Braddock Road. Personal journals and official military reports and correspondence are gold mines for anyone who studies the people, events and daily life of the past. The material collected here is extracted from the records of British army regulars (including Braddock, St. Clair, Gage and others), colonial militia (Cresap, Croghan, Gist, Washington, etc.), camp followers, American colonists (Burd, Hamilton, Franklin, Dinwiddie, Delancy, etc.), French-Canadians (Contrecoeur, Dumas, Lotbinier, etc.) and newspapers. The ultimate battle is described firsthand. Short biographical sketches, a chronology and a list of sources round out this comprehensive study. These fascinating accounts are enhanced with informative annotations.

$42.00


Garbarino, William M., ALONG THE MONONGAHELA: A History of the Early Events along the Monongahela and Its Tributaries during the 18th Century. NEW copy, trade paperback. (Midway Publishing, 2000). Index. 104 pp.

~~~ Reflects upon the early inhabitants, Ohio Company, the F & I War, Pontiac's War, Dunmore's War, the Revolutionary War, the Indian Wars, the frontier forts, the Whiskey Rebellion and migration along the Monongahela River and its tributaries.

$9.95

Bradley, A.G., THE FIGHT WITH FRANCE FOR NORTH AMERICA , (3rd Edition). NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Heritage Books (reprint of original 1908 edition). Illustrations, maps, index, 391 pages.
~~~ "Beginning with the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, and the conditions and characteristics of the British-American colonies in Canada in 1750, the author lays the background for the French designs against British expansion. He then proceeds to describe the various clashes between the two European powers in America, including the fight at Great Meadows, Braddock’s Expedition, and Johnson’s futile campaign on Lake George, that led to the formal declaration of war between France and England in May, 1756. The fighting continues through the battles at Louisbourg, Fort William Henry, Ticonderoga, Frontenac, and the Plains of Abraham as well as the deaths of Wolfe and Montcalm. The British triumphed in the end and the French surrendered Montreal and their possessions in North America to Great Britain."

$31.50




Bruhac, Josepth, THE WINTER PEOPLE. NEW copy. Trade PAPERBACK. (Puffin Books), 168 pages.
~~~ As the French and Indian War rages in October of 1759, Saxso, a fourteen-year-old Abenaki boy, pursues the English rangers who have attacked his village and taken his mother and sisters hostage.

$5.99




Coleman, Emma Lewis, NEW ENGLAND CAPTIVES CARRIED TO CANADA BETWEEN 1677 AND 1760 DURING THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WARS . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. TWO VOLUMES. Heritage Books, 2005. Index, 890 pages.
~~~ In 1897, C. Alice Baker published True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars, which Heritage Books reprinted several years ago, but which is now out of print. Following the initial publication of that work, Ms. Baker and Emma Lewis Coleman continued to research this topic, scouring the libraries and archives of New England and Canada for information. Following the death of Ms. Baker, Ms. Coleman prepared the present volumes using all the data they had accumulated over several decades. These volumes name all the captives they discovered and provide biographical data on each, but the sketches on those people who had been covered in the earlier volume are abbreviated in comparison to those who had not been covered in the first compilation. This work provides an extensive picture of the Indian attacks on New England communities over about an eighty-year period, and in terms of identifying their captives, it is probably the most definitive work ever published. Sources are cited in footnotes and an appendix identifies various people and places mentioned in the text. There is a complete name index.

$60.00




Cooper, James Fenimore THE DEERSLAYER. NEW copy. Trade PAPERBACK. (Penguin Classics), 548 pages.
~~~ Set in 1740 during the French and Indian Wars, The Deerslayer testifies to the murderous humanity and natural beauty on which the history of America was written.

$12.00




Cooper, James Fenimore THE PATHFINDER. NEW copy. Trade PAPERBACK. (Oxford: Oxford University Press), Originally published in 1840. 484 pages.
~~~ The Pathfinder, the fourth of the five Leatherstocking Tales, is set on Lake Ontario during the French and Indian Wars. Natty Bumppo and the Mohican chieftain Chingachgook are serving as scouts with the British forces at Ontario. A stirring account of Europeans, Indians, and colonials on the American frontier, the novel is also a critique of Jacksonian democracy and a meditation on the course of American civilization.

$9.95




Keehn, Sally M., I AM REGINA. NEW copy. Trade PAPERBACK. (Puffin Books), 240 pages.
~~~ In 1755, as the French and Indian War begins, ten-year-old Regina is kidnapped by Indians in central Pennsylvania, and she must struggle to hold onto memories of her earlier life as she grows up under the name of Tskinnak and starts to become Indian herself. (Ages 10-14).

$6.99





Kemmer, Brenton C., WAR, HELL AND HONOR: A Novel of the French and Indian War, 1755. . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Heritage Books, 2001. 171 pages.
~~~ When Charles Nurse volunteered with his neighbors and friends to enlist in the Amesbury, Massachusetts, Militia, he could not have imagined the sights, terrors, and adventures he would find. He learned what it meant to become a soldier, with endless days of marching, drills and fatigue duty. He saw the seedy side of camp life among soldiers from the different colonies. He witnessed for the first time the spectacle of a council of war between Sir William Johnson and his loyal Indian followers. He accompanied the famous Robert Rogers and his Rangers on several hair-raising scouting missions into French-held territory. And, during the bloody Battle of Lake George, he experienced the horror of combat, and the devastation it wrought on the men and their families. Charles Nurse also found out how it felt to fall in love. He would learn the true meaning of War, Hell, and Honor.

$14.95







Brumwell, Stephen. WHITE DEVIL: A True Story of War, Savagery and Vengenace in Colonial America . NEW copy. hardcover with dust jacket. (Da Capo Press, 2005). Notes, appendices, 'Dramatis Personae', index, 335 pages.
~~ It was North America's first major conflict, known today as the French and Indian War. In that conflict, France and England - both allied with Native American tribes - fought each other in a series of bloody battles and terrifying raids. And no confrontation was more brutal and notorious than the massacre of the British garrison of Fort William Henry in what is now upstate New York - an incident memorably depicted in James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans." That atrocity stoked calls for revenge - and the tough young Major Robert Rogers and his 'rangers' were ordered into enemy territory to take it. On the morning of October 4, 1759, they surprised the Abenaki Indian village of St. Francis, slaughtering its sleeping inhabitants without mercy. After the attack, Rogers's band endured a nightmarish journey home. Some were captured and tortured to death by vengeful pursuers, others resorted to cannibalism rather than starve in the frozen wilderness. Those raiders who staggered back to safety were hailed as heroes by the colonists, their indomitable leader immortalized as 'the brave Major Rogers.' But the Abenakis remembered Rogers very differently: To them he was Wobomagonda - 'White Devil'.
~~ From Library Journal: "Brumwell (Redcoats: The British Soldier and War in the Americas, 1755-1763) tells the real story of Maj. Robert Rogers and his famous band of Rangers, who marched into French territory to exact ruthless retribution on the Abenaki Indians for their massacre of settlers at Fort William Henry. Brumwell dramatically depicts the stealth involved in reaching the Abenaki at the St. Francis River Basin, the details of the brutal slaughter, and the harrowing retreat to final safety, offering different perspectives based on scant narratives from the Abenaki and accounts from survivors. Brumwell also relied on more than 250 years of North American, British, and French archived documents to explore the truth behind this controversial episode from America's aggressive past. This is an excellent update to John R. Cuneo's Robert Rogers of the Rangers and complements Fred Anderson's Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766. Highly recommended for all Colonial American history collections."

$27.50


Loescher, Burt Garfield. THE HISTORY OF ROGERS' RANGERS, Volume 1: The Beginnings (January 1755 - April 6, 1758). NEW copy. HARDCOVER, issued by publisher without dust jacket. Heritage Books, 2005. Reprint of the 1901 edition. Illustrations, maps, (index in Vol II), 438 pages.
~~~ This facsimile edition of the rare 1946 classic is based chiefly on the Loudoun Manuscripts. Here is the history of the very beginning of Rogers’ Rangers, the elite military unit that set the standards for future special forces. Volume 1 covers the years in which Ranger activities reached their height during the French & Indian War. The wealth of information to be found in Mr. Loescher’s books can hardly be overstated. Includes maps of the two famous snowshoe battles of La Barbue Creek and Rogers’ Rock, and a fold-out map of 22 early Ranger battles between 1755-1758.

$63.00


Loescher, Burt Garfield. GENESIS: ROGERS' RANGERS, Volume 2: The First Green Berets. (April 6, 1758 - December 24, 1783). . NEW copy. HARDCOVER, issued by publisher without dust jacket. Heritage Books, 2000. Illustrations, maps, (index in Vol II), 311 pages.
~~~ This collectible classic, much sought after by connoisseurs of colonial American military history, is once again in print. Originally published in 1969, it constitutes Volume II of Burt Loescher's meticulously researched History of Rogers' Rangers. This work offers the complete record of every action, ambuscade, scout and expedition of Major Robert Rogers and his Rangers from April 6, 1758 (just after their defeat in the Battle on Snowshoes during the French and Indian War), to their disbandment on December 24, 1783, at the end of the American Revolution. From 1758 to 1761, the Rangers were active as scouts and advance guards from Canada to the West Indies. Known mainly for their ambuscades around Fort Ticonderoga and Lake Champlain, they also served at the siege of Louisbourg, the fall of Quebec, on the Great Lakes, and in the Southern theatre against the Cherokee. In 1763 the corps was revived to take part in Pontiac's Rebellion. During the American Revolution, Rogers fought on the British side and commanded Rogers' Queen's and King's Rangers. Tragically, this extraordinary leader died in disgrace a few years after the Revolution in a London debtors' prison. Robert Rogers' famous Ranging Rules for bush fighting have been handed down and adapted by elite military corps such as Darby's Rangers in World War II and the Green Berets in Vietnam. Mr. Loescher's monumental study of Rogers' Rangers remains unequaled to this day. The 20-page bibliography alone is a valuable research aid. It lists principal sources from the Public Records Office in London; Huntington Library; the Public Archives of Canada; Clements Library; Rogers' papers, and dozens of unpublished diaries and other works. Several excellent battle maps illuminate the text, along with a portrait of Major Rogers by the well-known artist, R. S. Embleton, and an illustration by the author of Rogers' Rangers' uniforms, 1758-1783. Attractively hardbound in dark green cloth and stamped with gold foil.

$37.00


Loescher, Burt Garfield. THE HISTORY OF ROGERS' RANGERS, Volume 3: Officers and Non-commissioned Officers. . NEW copy. HARDCOVER, issued by publisher without dust jacket. Heritage Books, 2001. Illustrations, index, 86 pages.
~~~ You have read about their daring exploits as the first elite fighting unit in America, but have you ever wondered just who the individual Rangers were? Was one of them your ancestor? A treasure trove of biographical material, this work contains information on more than 200 Rangers (some of whom served in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution), the legendary Robert Rogers himself, John Stark, the Brewers, Moses Hazen, the Stockbridge Mohegans, and the lesser-known men of all ranks including surgeons, clerks, cadets and corporals. This edition also includes a preface and the text of a discourse presented by the author to the Rogers Island Historical Society. Previously available in extremely limited quantities, this rare work has been completely re-typeset and includes a new fullname index that makes it a useful companion to the others in the series. It is enhanced with black and white illustrations, and is handsomely hardbound to match Volumes I and II. All known information is given, including if possible: place of birth, names of parents and spouse, place and date of enlistment, military service and commissions, notable events in military and civilian life, land grants, date of discharge, date and/or place of death. It is true that “a ghastly death stalked ever at their side,” and some Rangers were cut down early in their careers, thus leaving a shorter record than others.

$20.00


Loescher, Burt Garfield. THE HISTORY OF ROGERS' RANGERS, Volume 4: The St. Francis Raid. . NEW copy. HARDCOVER, issued by publisher without dust jacket. Heritage Books, 2002. Illustrations, maps, appendices, bibliography, 314 pages.
~~~ At last, from the undisputed expert on Rogers’ Rangers, here is the long-awaited chronicle of this tragic and infamous event. This phenomenal “commando” attack, initially successful, would be forever scarred by the violent deaths and starvation suffered by the Rangers during their return journey. Burt Loescher traveled thousands of miles tracing the routes of the separate Ranger parties, interviewing old- timers and descendants, and digging through hundreds of archival documents to painstakingly piece together the truth of the St. Francis Raid. There are many threads to this story, including its historical background, the events that occurred early in the expedition that foretold its outcome, and the separate agonies that befell the 11 groups of Rangers when the main force divided during the retreat from St. Francis. Extracts from actual Ranger diaries and journals provide authentic accounts of the journey, as well as shedding light on the personalities of the Rangers themselves. Many legends have grown around the story of the St. Francis Raid, most of them centering around the valuable silver and gold treasures stolen from the mission chapel by the Rangers and buried along the return routes when the men became too weak with hunger to continue to carry their heavy loads. Some say the Rangers were “cursed” for destroying and desecrating the mission. You will be able to retrace the separate trails by following the detailed descriptions and maps in this book. Mr. Loescher went far beyond Rogers’ own Journal accounts to get to the truth of the St. Francis Raid. He combed the documents in the Loudoun and Amherst Papers, colonial newspaper accounts, narratives, and, most importantly, some never-before published French accounts. He also disproves the legends that suffer from “credibility gaps.” Many newly discovered facts completely change our currently held notions of the Raid, which have been shaped by the novel and motion picture. So much new evidence has been turned up that a definitive volume on the Raid was imperative. The exhaustive Appendices, detailed maps, and splendid color illustrations by well-known Ranger artist Gary Zaboly and Ron Embleton, make this study a complete source of reference for the historian, the treasure hunter, the Rogers’ Ranger enthusiast, as well as the lover of exciting early Americana.

$58.00

Ross, John F. WAR ON THE RUN: The Epic Story of Robert Rogers and the Conquest of America's First Frontier. NEW copy, hardcover with dust jacket. (Bantam, 2009). Maps, chronology, bibliography, index. 576 pp.
~~~ Hailed as the father of today’s elite special forces, Robert Rogers was not only a wilderness warrior but North America’s first noteworthy playwright and authentic celebrity. In a riveting biography, John F. Ross reconstructs the extraordinary achievements of this fearless and inspiring leader whose exploits in the early New England wilderness read like those of an action hero and whose innovative principles of unconventional warfare are still used today.
~~~ They were a group of handpicked soldiers chosen for their backwoods savvy, courage, and endurance. Led by a young captain whose daring made him a hero on two continents, Rogers’s Rangers earned a deadly fame among their most formidable French and Indian enemies for their ability to appear anywhere at any time, burst out of the forest with overwhelming force, and vanish just as quickly. This swift, elusive, intelligence-gathering strike force was the brainchild of Robert Rogers, a uniquely American kind of war maker capable of motivating a new breed of warrior.
~~~ The child of marginalized Scots-Irish immigrants, Robert Rogers learned to survive in New England’s dark and deadly forests, grasping, as did few others, that a new world required new forms of warfare. Marrying European technology to the stealth and adaptability he observed in native warriors, Rogers trained and led an unorthodox unit of green provincials, raw woodsmen, farmers, and Indian scouts on “impossible” missions that are still the stuff of soldiers’ legend. Covering heartbreaking distances behind enemy lines, they traversed the wilderness in whaleboats and snowshoes, slept without fire or sufficient food in below-freezing temperatures, and endured hardships that would destroy ordinary men.
~~~ With their novel tactics and fierce esprit de corps, the Rangers laid the groundwork for the colonial strategy later used in the War of Independence. Never have the stakes of a continent hung in the hands of so few men. Rogers would eventually write two seminal books whose vision of a unified continent would influence Thomas Jefferson and inspire the Lewis and Clark expedition.
~~~ In War on the Run, John F. Ross vividly re-creates Rogers’s life and his spectacular battles, having traveled over much of Rogers’s campaign country. He presents with breathtaking immediacy and painstaking accuracy a man and an era whose enormous influence on America has been too little appreciated.

$30.00






Speare, Elizabeth George, CALICO CAPTIVE. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Houghton Mifflin), 274 pages.
~~~ In August, 1754, on the brink of the French and Indian War, James Johnson, his wife Susanna, and their children were captured in an Indian raid on Charleston, New Hampshire. They were taken from their home, forced to march through the wilderness to the north, and sold to the French in Montreal, where they were held for ransom. Years later, when she was nearly seventy years old, Susanna Johnson wrote an account of this journey, and it is from her narrative that the mains events of this story are taken.

$16.00




Swerling, Beverly, SHADOWBROOK: A Novel of Love, War, and the Birth of America. NEW copy. Hardcover with dust jacket. (Simon & Schuster, 2004), 490 pages.
~~~ From Publishers Weekly: "Swerling's sweeping fictional account of the French and Indian War rivals Harold Coyle's 1997 novel, Savage Wilderness, in its masterful treatment of the hardship, brutality and treachery of America's colonial wars. Covering the years 1754-1760, with the British, French and Indians slaughtering each other for king and empire, Swerling tells of two men who straddle the white and red man's worlds, desperate to preserve the best of each culture, but fearful they will lose everything they love. Quentin Hale is a gentleman turned scout whose family owns a prosperous New York plantation called Shadowbrook. He is white, but also follows the Indian ways of his adopted tribe, the Potawatomi. Cormac Shea is part-Irish and part-Indian, nearly a brother to Hale, but he wants all whites driven from Canada. Together these men find themselves caught up in a bloody war neither wants, but they must fight to save the plantation and create a homeland for the Indians. Hale faces treachery at home from his sadistic and greedy elder brother, John; from a scheming one-eyed Scot; and from lying, corrupt politicians who want to steal his legacy; he also has an Indian enemy who wants to cut out his heart. Hale and Shea fight in many battles, mostly massacres, from Louisbourg and Fort William Henry to the climactic battle at Quebec. Surrounding them are colorful historical figures like the young George Washington, the hapless General Braddock and the powerful Ottawa chief, Pontiac. Swerling also cleverly reveals the arrogant influence of the Catholic Church in politics, the duplicity of governmental promises and the forced migration of Acadians from Nova Scotia. The complexity of the history involved may daunt some readers, but most will be captivated by Swerling's intricate plot, colorful characters and convincing descriptions of colonial life".


$24.95




Wahil, Andrew J., BRADDOCK ROAD CHRONICLES, 1755: From the Diaries and Records of Members of the Braddock Expedition and Others Arranged in a Day by Day Chronology . NEW copy. TRADE PAPERBACK. Heritage Books, 1999. Illustrations, maps, 489 pages. "In 1755 Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock was put in charge of constructing a road from the Potomac River at Wills Creek (Cumberland, MD), to Fort Duquesne (present-day Pittsburgh) at the forks of the Ohio River. His object was to take the fort and thereby launch the conquest of French-held North America. Although Braddock was killed not far from his goal in the grisly clash known today as Braddock's Defeat, the route that he opened ultimately became a highway for western emigration, and part of it was incorporated in the National Road. The making of the Braddock Road was an engineering marvel that tested the abilities and endurance of its builders. The remarkable detail contained in this compilation is too vast to mention here but includes descriptions of forts, personnel, food, Indians, clothing, lodging and more. Carpenters, artificers, shoemakers, tailors, wagonmasters, farriers, nurses, cooks: nothing less than a traveling city was required in the construction of the Braddock Road. Personal journals and official military reports and correspondence are gold mines for anyone who studies the people, events and daily life of the past. The material collected here is extracted from the records of British army regulars (including Braddock, St. Clair, Gage and others), colonial militia (Cresap, Croghan, Gist, Washington, etc.), camp followers, American colonists (Burd, Hamilton, Franklin, Dinwiddie, Delancy, etc.), French-Canadians (Contrecoeur, Dumas, Lotbinier, etc.) and newspapers. The ultimate battle is described firsthand. Short biographical sketches, a chronology and a list of sources round out this comprehensive study. These fascinating accounts are enhanced with informative annotations."

$42.00





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